bad sector

(redirected from Bad sectors)

bad sector

[‚bad ′sek·tər]
(computer science)
An area of disk storage that does not record data reliably and therefore is not used.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bad sector

A segment of disk storage that cannot be read or written because of a physical problem in the disk. Bad sectors on hard disks are marked by the operating system and bypassed. If data are recorded in a sector that becomes bad, file recovery software, and sometimes special hardware, must be used to restore it.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
The other problem was that currently, the NAS box had 2 regular old 3.5-inch hard-drives, both of which had some bad sectors. The drives were old and could technically fail at any time, but they did not have any data on them that wasn't replaceable.
This could also result in bad sectors in the disk and eventually cause a boot failure.
The main difference between hard drives and SSDs is this: The area of a hard drive that can hold data can be rewritten as many times as is needed, and will always be usable as long as the drive is functioning (bad sectors aside).
We published three editions of the survey where we poll our clients and other economists in the local market about the outlook for the economy to try to separate the good sectors from the bad sectors.
It is important to note the good and bad sectors of your birth chart, so you know which area to avoid or use.
Bad sectors lead to damaged data files that can no longer be accessed reliably.
"We do not believe there are good sectors and bad sectors necessarily.
With age, drives develop more and more bad sectors. If bad sectors result in damaged files that can no longer be accessed, it is a common practice to attempt to recover the files directly on the damaged drive.
There can be good people operating in bad sectors and bad people in good sectors, so we focus on looking at the people we're dealing with.
Indeed, in the bad sectors, over 90 percent of suppliers can be loss making, on our figures, and in the good ones over 90 percent can be profitable.
The top highlight of this data recovery hardware is its universal data recovery ability to handle logical data recovery (accidental deletion, format, virus attack, blue screen, etc.), firmware-level data recovery (when hard drives fail to be detected by PCs due to firmware corruptions) and physical data recovery (drives with a lot of bad sectors, clicking noises and even head damage, etc.).
A quick fix for this involves running a disk scan which checks for disc errors and fixes the bad sectors (some examples are scandisk and checkdsk utilities in windows).