Vyasa

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Vyasa

 

(also known as Veda-Vyasa, arranger of the Vedas; as Dvaipayana, the islander; and as Krishna, the black one), ancient Indian legendary poet and sage. Authorship of the Mahabharata is ascribed to Vyasa, as is the systematization of the Vedic hymns and authorship of the puranas VedantaSutra (aphorisms of vedantic philosophy) and other works of ancient Indian literature. Vyasa speaks out as a character in the Mahabharata. In legends about Vyasa characteristics of many poets and sages of ancient India have apparently merged.

References in periodicals archive ?
The System of the Vedanta According to Badarayana's Brahma-Sutras and Sankara's Commentary thereon set forth as a Compendium of the Dogmatics of Brahmanism from the standpoint of Sankara.
In his commentary to Badarayana's Brahma-sutra (2, 2, 28-32) Sankara directs his criticism at the Jainas by accusing them of ascribing to a theory of indeterminacy; that is, that the Jainas subscribe to a theory of uncertainty about the nature of reality, that they are in doubt (samsaya) about how to describe an object of inquiry definitively, or that they uphold a theory of scepticism or agnosticism.
(49) One can examine an example of Clooney's interreligious hermeneutics by studying his comparative reading of passages from Badarayana's Uttara Mimamsa Sutras (fifth century C.E.) with Amalananda's commentary, alongside excerpts from the Summa Theologiae.
This argument has been reiterated in Baladeva's commentary to the Vedanta-sutras of Badarayana in which he wrote, "If the Self could perceive His own properties, He could also perceive Himself; which is absurd, since one and the same thing cannot be both the agent and the object of an action" (Vasu, p.
The., Purva Mimamsa by Jaimini which is concerned with the correct interpretation of the Vedic ritual and Uttaramimamsa by Badarayana (a great sage of the yore) which deals chiefly with the nature of Brahman.
Thus, his study is Advaita Vedanta as Text, including the Upanishads, Badarayana's Uttara Mimamsa Sutras, Sankara's Bhasya (8th cent.
Vaisesika, Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Jaina, and Yoga traditions all develop sutra-collections associated with the respective lineage figures of Kanada, Gautama, Jaimini, Badarayana, Umasvati, and Patanjali.
129 (Badarayana), 144 (RV 1.15 celebrates Dilipa, of course, not Raghu), 152 (Mrcchakatik).
The first of these chapters treats pre-Sankara Advaita and includes, in addition to discussions of Badarayana's Brahmasutra and Gaudapada's Mandukya-karika, a brief mention of Bhartrhari and a somewhat fuller treatment of Mandanamisra, who represents a form of pre-Sankara Advaita despite being (probably) Sankara's contemporary.
For example, in his "Abridgement of the Vedant" (i.e., of Badarayana's Brahmasutras) in translating 3.4.27, Rammohun adds "and good acts" to the text's "calmness and control over the sense organs" (V.
The analyses depend almost entirely on primary, mostly Sanskrit texts, though some attention is given to Tibetan sources; due to the limits of the chosen period, important later developments are omitted - most notably the entirety of Vedanta philosophy, since Oberhammer is reluctant to try to identify the concepts operative in Badarayana's bare sutra text without the help of the Vedanta commentaries from the post-Dignaga period.