Vyasa

(redirected from Badarayana)

Vyasa

 

(also known as Veda-Vyasa, arranger of the Vedas; as Dvaipayana, the islander; and as Krishna, the black one), ancient Indian legendary poet and sage. Authorship of the Mahabharata is ascribed to Vyasa, as is the systematization of the Vedic hymns and authorship of the puranas VedantaSutra (aphorisms of vedantic philosophy) and other works of ancient Indian literature. Vyasa speaks out as a character in the Mahabharata. In legends about Vyasa characteristics of many poets and sages of ancient India have apparently merged.

References in periodicals archive ?
The specific passages from Badarayana and Amalananda that Clooney examines are Uttara Mimamsa Sutra 3.
This argument has been reiterated in Baladeva's commentary to the Vedanta-sutras of Badarayana in which he wrote, "If the Self could perceive His own properties, He could also perceive Himself; which is absurd, since one and the same thing cannot be both the agent and the object of an action" (Vasu, p.
Purva Mimamsa by Jaimini which is concerned with the correct interpretation of the Vedic ritual and Uttaramimamsa by Badarayana (a great sage of the yore) which deals chiefly with the nature of Brahman.
Vaisesika, Nyaya, Mimamsa, Vedanta, Jaina, and Yoga traditions all develop sutra-collections associated with the respective lineage figures of Kanada, Gautama, Jaimini, Badarayana, Umasvati, and Patanjali.