Bagehot


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Bagehot

Walter. 1826--77, English economist and journalist: editor of The Economist; author of The English Constitution (1867) Physics and Politics (1872), and Lombard Street (1873)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A hundred years after Bagehot, I was first to identify management as the new social institution of the emerging society of organizations and, a little later, to spot the emergence of knowledge as the new central resource, and knowledge workers as the new ruling class of a society that is not only "postindustrial" but postsocialist and increasingly, postcapitalist.
"A princely marriage is the brilliant edition of a universal fact, and, as such, it rivets mankind," wrote Bagehot. "A royal family sweetens politics by the seasonable addition of nice and pretty events."
Incisive debates - the ones described by Bagehot as educating the public - on key amendments can easily be silenced by a simple crack of the political whip.
If Bagehot were alive today, he would doubtless applaud the British media for still upholding this distinction.
Explaining the sources of Britain's world dominance in nineteenth-century trade in his book Lombard Street (1873), Walter Bagehot pointed to the vast agglomerations of capital in London banks: "A million in the hands of a single banker is a great power; he can at once lend it where he will, and borrowers can come to him, because they know or believe that he has it.
"We must not let in daylight upon magic," British essayist Walter Bagehot once wrote of the English monarchy in general, and Queen Victoria in particular.
Walter Bagehot in his book on the English Constitution said that the monarch still has'the right to be consulted, the right to encourage, the right to warn,' and ex hypothesi the inherent right to preserve the unity of the kingdom.
These observations are in accordance with the prescription introduced by Walter Bagehot in 1873 that collateral should be good in normal times, not necessarily during the crisis.
In an 1855 essay, "The First Edinburgh Reviewers," Walter Bagehot claims "review writing but exemplifies the casual character of modern writing" (52) and appeals, formally, to the distracted modern reader, with his "head full of sums," "reverting perpetually [...
Even if he had many formal powers (Bagehot, 1873: 31-33), the head of state has chosen not to exercise them.
And Alexis de Tocqueville and Walter Bagehot were liberals.
FAN BLOG CHRIS QUINN @chrisquinn3 "AN inability to stay quiet is one of the most conspicuous failings of mankind - Walter Bagehot".