Bagrat III

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bagrat III

 

Born 975; died 1014. Georgian tsar.

Bagrat III united Western Georgia and a considerable part of Eastern Georgia (Kartli, Kakheti, and Ereti) under his rule. He was an adopted son of the ruler Tao-Klardzheti David and nephew of the Abkhazian tsar Feodosii. Basing his power on the members of the nobility, Bagrat III struggled stubbornly with large feudal lords who were opposed to the unification of the country and also with the Arab conquerors.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
[1] Surviving evidence speaks largely of the political unification of the various Georgian districts in the eleventh century, at first through Bagrat III's simultaneous rule over [K.sup.[subset]][art.sup.[subset]]li, [Ap.sup.[subset]][xazet.sup.[subset]]i, and the neo[K.sup.[subset]][art.sup.[subset]]velian enterprise in the southwestern domains and then through the systematic conquests of his successors.
The Bagratids' expansionistic agenda broadened incrementally and in 1008 Bagrat III succeeded in joining for the first time the thrones of [K.sup.[[subset]][art.sup.[subset]]li and [Ap.sup.[subset]][xazet.sup.[subset]]i (the core regions of eastern and western Georgia, respectively) as well as the pivotal southwestern Armeno[K.sup.[subset]][art.sup.[subset]]velian borderlands.
Its title even adorned the intitulatio of Bagratid kings like Adarnase II and Bagrat III. A number of different Byzantine dignities, like magistros ([LANGUAGE IS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and patrikios ([LANGUAGE IS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), were held by other high-ranking Bagratids.
994-1008), [45] the father of Bagrat III, took the title of [mep.sup.[subset]][et.sup.[subset]]-[mep.sup.[subset]]e, or "king of kings," upon his accession: