Bahadur Shah II


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Bahadur Shah II

(bähä`do͝or shä), 1775–1862, last MughalMughal
or Mogul
, Muslim empire in India, 1526–1857. The dynasty was founded by Babur, a Turkic chieftain who had his base in Afghanistan. Babur's invasion of India culminated in the battle of Panipat (1526) and the occupation of Delhi and Agra.
..... Click the link for more information.
 emperor of India (1837–57). A political figurehead, he was completely controlled by the British East India Company, who found it convenient to maintain the fiction of Mughal rule. He was an old man of 82 at the time of the Indian MutinyIndian Mutiny,
1857–58, revolt that began with Indian soldiers in the Bengal army of the British East India Company but developed into a widespread uprising against British rule in India. It is also known as the Sepoy Rebellion, sepoys being the native soldiers.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (1857–58) but, implicated by a rebel proclamation, he was convicted of complicity and exiled to Rangoon for life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rumour has it, it belonged to Bahadur Shah II, the last in a long line of rulers who controlled areas of South Asia from 1586 to 1857.
1) of the last Mughal emperor, Bahadur Shah II, a full set of mid 17th-century equestrian armour from the Royal Armouries, and an enormous jade carving of a terrapin native to the Ganges (c.
The mournful photo of Bahadur Shah II as the last, and by then deposed, Mughal emperor provides a finale to the exhibition.
According to the Telegraph, among the exhibition's highlights will be the gold and gem-set crown worn by Bahadur Shah II, the last Mughal emperor who ruled from 1837 to 1858, who was deposed and exiled to Burma after Britain took full control of India.
a puppet of the British monarchy, Bahadur Shah II was coerced to support and effectively initiate the Rebellion of 1857 whose failure led to the end of Mughal rule.
The lack of interest in this period by historians is, I believe, not due to the absence of primary sources, for there exists in the Oriental and India Office Collections of the British Library, as well as in various archives in India and Pakistan a vast amount of material, including original correspondence of Shah Alam, Akbar Shah and Bahadur Shah II with the British and some contemporary Persian accounts by native authors which could keep a large number of researchers occupied for years to come.
Munshi Faiz Uddin in his Bazm-i Akhir, which has an introduction by Prince Muhammad Sulaiman Shah Gorgani, head of the Timurid family and son of Bahadur Shah II, gives us a detailed description of these palace guards:
In 1850 Ghalib was appointed poet laureate to the last Mughal emperor, Bahadur Shah II.
The last of the Mogul emperors, Bahadur Shah II (1775-1862), was deposed and the Mogul dynasty came to an end after two and a quarter centuries.