bail out

(redirected from Bail-out)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

bail out

To abandon aircraft by parachute and not with the help of an ejection seat, if fitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
Public anger over the bail-out, along with bail-outs for Wall Street banks, contributed to heavy losses for Obama's Democrats in November 2 congressional elections.
David Blundell, chairman of the action group which organised the meeting, said he had heard from hundreds of investors who had lost money during the bail-out.
On Friday European leaders released a statement seeking to reassure Ireland's panicky creditors by promising that tougher new terms for future bail-outs of indebted countries would not harm them.
The Lloyds TSB merger with HBOS is already in the in-tray, alongside yesterday's formal notification from London of the Bradford and Bingley rescue plan, the Fortis and Dexia bail-outs in Belgium, and the bail-out of Germany's Hypo Real Estate.
The inquiry by the Financial Services Authority (FSA) is expected to examine a range of issues, including the banks' risk management processes and the conduct of directors prior to the first wave of bail-outs, the Sunday Telegraph said.
The Spanish government, now struggling with its own economic crisis and likely to need a massive EU bail-out, urged Greek politicians to resolve their differences and stick to the austerity path to avoid further economic "contagion".
Investors would flee peripherals and plunk their money in safer bets, like German or US bonds, driving up borrowing costs for Rome and Madrid and potentially forcing them into bail-outs, too.
It is unusual for the UK to get involved in the bail-out mechanism for
No one can possibly know in advance exactly how big this "bill" might be, though that question--important as that is--misses the crucial point: a common bond would be the first step down a slippery slope to bail-outs, and thus to the end of the euro area as a zone of stability.
5 billion bail-out package drafted by the French government.
Stock markets fell heavily and money markets remained frozen as banks continued to refuse to lend to each other on Monday, hours before US politicians rejected a $700bn bail-out package.
Defending the internal support model advocated by the Commission he expressed his firm conviction that "this is preferable to a policy of introducing bail-out after bail-out, not only for the farmers concerned, but also because of the instability this causes on world markets".