Guernsey

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Guernsey

(gûrn`zē), island, 25 sq mi (65 sq km), in the English Channel, second largest of the Channel Islands. Guernsey bailiwick (2005 est. pop. 65,000) includes AlderneyAlderney
, Fr. Aurigny , anc. Riduna, island (1991 pop. 2,297), c.3 sq mi (7.7 sq km), in the English Channel, northernmost of the larger Channel Islands. It is separated from the French coast and from the other islands by swift tidal races.
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, SarkSark,
Fr. Sercq (sĕrk), island (1991 pop. 575), 2 sq mi (5 sq km), in the English Channel, E of Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands. It is divided into Great Sark and Little Sark, which are connected by a natural causeway, the Coupée.
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, Herm, Brechou, Jethou, and smaller islands. Guernsey has a low beach in the north and rocky cliffs along the south shore. The shipping and distribution center and chief town is Saint Peter Port. Exports include dairy products, fruits, flowers, vegetables, and Guernsey cattle. It is a tourist site.
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Guernsey

1. an island in the English Channel: the second largest of the Channel Islands, which, with Alderney and Sark, Herm, Jethou, and some islets, forms the bailiwick of Guernsey; finance, market gardening, dairy farming, and tourism. Capital: St Peter Port. Pop.: 59 710 (2001). Area: 63 sq. km (24.5 sq. miles)
2. a breed of dairy cattle producing rich creamy milk, originating from the island of Guernsey
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(10) There are passing references to literature about Guernsey or written by Guernsey authors in many general histories, for example in Marr's History of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. Duncan King's article, 'The Imaginative Literature of the Channel Islands', Transactions of La Societe Guernesiaise, 22 (1987), 274-95, is indispensable, but it is bibliographical in nature and King does not offer sustained analysis or criticism of any of the texts he cites.
This problem exists primarily on the island of Sark in the Bailiwick of Guernsey. This island has a total resident population of approximately 575; however, directorships held by Sark residents total approximately 15,000.
The Bailiwick of Guernsey,in turn, is a Dependency of the UK,but other than for defence and foreign affairs its government is free to run its territory as it wishes.
Applications are being invited for new mobile licences - two third generation and one second generation - in the Bailiwick of Guernsey.
The Bailiwick of Guernsey includes the delightful little islands of Alderney, Sark and Herm.
The IMF's Report on Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism for the Bailiwick of Guernsey can be found at: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2011/cr1112.pdf
The IMF's December 2010 "Detailed Assessment Report on Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism" for the Bailiwick of Guernsey can be found at: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/scr/2011/cr1112.pdf
The Bailiwick of Guernsey (the Bailiwick) covers a number of the Channel Islands (Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, and Herm in order of size and population).