Baily's beads


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Baily's beads:

see eclipseeclipse
[Gr.,=failing], in astronomy, partial or total obscuring of one celestial body by the shadow of another. Best known are the lunar eclipses, which occur when the earth blocks the sun's light from the moon, and solar eclipses, occurring when the moon blocks the sun's light
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Baily's beads

A string of brilliant points of sunlight sometimes seen, very briefly, at the Moon's edge just before or just after totality in a solar eclipse. They are the result of sunlight shining through the valleys on the Moon's limb as the Sun just disappears or emerges from behind the Moon. They were first described by Francis Baily after the eclipse of 1836. See also diamond-ring effect.

Baily's beads

[′bāl‚ēz ¦bēdz]
(astronomy)
Bright points of sunlight appearing around the edge of the moon just before and after the central phase of a total solar eclipse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photographs of the partial eclipse, Baily's Beads, the diamond ring, and the chromosphere don't need to cover a field of view much larger than the 1/2[degrees] diameter of the Sun's disk.
It wasn't the gut-wrenching splendor of a total solar eclipse; it was a quiet wonder as the uneven circle of Baily's Beads began to form and then turn into a beautifully symmetrical ring.
Each has an irregular shape, so a total eclipse by one of them is not likely to show the Sun's corona in all its glory, nor the beautiful array of prominences and Baily's Beads that we often behold from Earth.
Then one side of the Moon rapidly brightened into a dazzling display of Baily's Beads and totality was over.
During the ring eclipse on May 10, 1994, the Moon covered only 94 percent of the Sun's face, but several observers saw and photographed Baily's Beads and the chromosphere.
Baily's Beads will then appear, not just along the Moon's leading edge, but all around the lunar limb.
Jay Norman notes that this phenomenon is a precise analogue of Baily's Beads, where the Sun appears through clefts in lunar mountains during a total solar eclipse, and he has dubbed it "Clari's Beads" in honor of his wife's observations.