Buchis

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Buchis

black bull worshiped as chief city god. [Egypt. Rel.: Parrinder, 52]
See: Bull
References in periodicals archive ?
He said this while addressing a ceremony held here in Dera Bakha.
He obtained a BA in Engineering from Sultan Qaboos University in 2003 and is Director of Works in the provinces of Khasab and Bakha for the Omani Water and Electricity Commission.
At the end of Untouchable in a somewhat contrived scene Anand has his naive young protagonist, Bakha, confronted in rapid succession by three alternative solutions to his intolerable situation.
In retrieving an ethical position in Anand's representation of Bakha, despite its clear paternalism, Shingavi writes against the dominant view in the Foucault/Said/Spivak-influenced strands of postcolonial theory that any act of representation is necessarily an act of power.
A tender to renovate and improve the condition of the Khasab to Bakha road was approved by the Tender Committee in 2012, but work hasn't seen the light of day so far.
According to activist Omar Hamza, the Damascus killings occurred after a group of soldiers defected and were pursued by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad into the village of Bakha north of the capital.
It is reported to have claimed responsibility for the attack in Peshawar's Bakha Ghulam area on Monday.
As per details, TMA Saddar started operation against encroachers in Dera Bakha and Lal Suhanra under the instructions of TMO Arshad Ghuman and Magistrate Rafique Malik.
The Bible references mastic as bakha, a word purportedly derived from the Hebrew expression to signify crying--symbolizing the "tears" of resin secreted by the evergreen shrub, and the softly weeping sound arising from trampled branches.
Then Bishkek mayor's office plans to link Shabdan Baatyr street with Tokonbaeva street, then extend it and link it with Tynalieva and Bakha street through Manas Prospekt and then link Bakha street with Fuchik street.
Set in India, Mulk Raj Anand's The Un touchable (1935) satirizes the Christian missionary Colonel Hutchinson, whose inability to persuade Bakha, a lavatory cleaner, of the benefits of conversion leaves Hutchinson convinced that technology in the form of the flush toilet is a more likely cure for the ills of untouchability.
Takasha takes us on one of her daily home visits to see Gerrada Bakha Abuk, a blind woman in her late seventies.