Bakke decision


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Bakke decision

“reverse discrimination” victim; entered medical school with Supreme Court’s help. [Am. Hist.: Facts (1978), 483]
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Ironically, race-based policies are posed as a threat to those "standards." Before the Bakke decision, race-consciousness was associated with being black and the race of white people was seen as invisible or at best seen as "irrelevant." Bakke not only made it politically viable for white people to organize around what had previously been an unattractive race-consciousness; it also gave them the basis to do so.
Since the Bakke decision in 1978, the courts have begun to render decisions that have undermined the legal and political legitimacy of affirmative action.
The Bakke decision was the grand-daddy of affirmative action cases, and probably the most important ruling on race and education since 1954 (when the Court, in Brown v.
For the many critics of the affirmative action policies that resulted from the Bakke decision, therein lies the rub.
What sets this volume apart is its focus on an empirical research question about the effect of the Bakke decision. To my knowledge, while there have been anecdotal accounts here and there, no one has undertaken a scholarly evaluation of how Bakke affected university admissions.
Supreme Court's 1978 Bakke decision, which is still the law of the land.
Embittered by the rightwing direction of the Court, and particularly the Bakke decision reversing affirmative action, he spoke out against Reagan, Bush, and his conservative colleagues, shocking the Washington establishment.
First, it can rule that Hawaii's exclusion of same-sex marriage is indeed a violation of the Equal Protection Clause, but a justified one (similar logic was used in the Bakke decision with respect to affirmative action).