Bakke decision


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Bakke decision

“reverse discrimination” victim; entered medical school with Supreme Court’s help. [Am. Hist.: Facts (1978), 483]
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Before the Bakke decision, race-consciousness was associated with being black and the race of white people was seen as invisible or at best seen as "irrelevant.
The Bakke decision was the grand-daddy of affirmative action cases, and probably the most important ruling on race and education since 1954 (when the Court, in Brown v.
That ended a 17-year policy begun with the 1978 Supreme Court Bakke decision permitting the use of race as one factor for the sake of institutional diversity.
First, it can rule that Hawaii's exclusion of same-sex marriage is indeed a violation of the Equal Protection Clause, but a justified one (similar logic was used in the Bakke decision with respect to affirmative action).
These rulings started with the 1978 Bakke decision and continued throughout the presidency of Ronald Reagan.
The National Urban League applauded the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the University of Michigan Law School's admissions polices, thereby reaffirming its Bakke decision and stating unequivocally that the government has a compelling interest in promoting diversity in education and the workplace.
Since the lawsuit came out in November, Harvard University spokespeople have consistently shared the same boilerplate statement from Robert Iuliano, senior vice president and general counsel at Harvard, attesting that Harvard has adhered to the Supreme Court Bakke decision.
THIS WEEK ON THE WEB: Michael Klare argues that at no point in modern American history has the civilian leadership of the nation's military establishment come under as much criticism from serving officers as in the current war in Iraq; Tim Shorrock examines the conflict-ridden business dealings of key members of Donald Rumsfeld's advisory group, the Defense Policy Board; Alfred Ross and Lee Cokorinos highlight the dangers to diversity from the Administration effort to overturn the 1978 Bakke decision (www.
University lawyers rely on the Bakke decision of 1978, which struck down quotas but upheld the use of race as a factor in admissions.
12) While the Bakke decision was produced by a sharply fractured court, I believe that the current Supreme Court will adhere to its precedential value in affirming the constitutionality and sound public policy of affirmative action.