Bakufu


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Related to Bakufu: Ainu, Bushido, daimyo

Bakufu

 

the government of three dynasties of military feudal rulers of Japan (the shoguns): Minamoto, Ashikaga, and Tokugawa. The Bakufu lasted from the end of the 12th century until 1867.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Diaoyu Islands up to 1868 then are Chinese and had never been part of Satsuma or taken over by the Shimazu clan; never part of Japan even though the Shimazu handed over at times part of the tributary payment that they received from the Ryukyu Kingdom to the Bakufu; and the islands were never part of the Ryukyu Kingdom whose relationship with the Chinese was at all times very cordial.
In light of the Opium Wars, strengthening European commercial and military presence in Asia and the Pacific, and the immediate, in some ways devastating, integration of Japan's full economy into world trade, the bakufu established several programs that served either as precedent for the Meiji state or as embarrassments and encumbrances prompting celeritous revision.
The appearance of several foreign ships off the coast of Tsushima caused the bakufu to renew its financial assistance to the island in order to defend the coast as well as to alleviate massive debts that the So family had incurred with merchants in Osaka and Edo.
The bakufu and domains were military organizations at their core, designed to regulate samurai warriors.
Bakufu officials agreed to open two ports--Hakodate in Hokkaido and Shimoda at the tip of the Izu Peninsula--to American ships, to treat shipwrecked sailors, and to permit an American consul to reside in Shimoda.
Razan was also made political advisor of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa Bakufu. Hence, it started what Maruyama Masao termed the "golden age of Confucianism in Japan." (33)
The last 150 years of the 250-year reign of the Tokugawa Bakufu was rife with economic failures.
TOBY, STATE AND DIPLOMACY IN EARLY MODERN JAPAN: ASIA IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOKUGAWA BAKUFU (1984); Kazui Tashiro, Foreign Relations During the Edo Period: Sakoku Reexamined, 8 J.
In that year the Tokugawa Bakufu began to impose restrictions on the trading system, and it was effectively terminated in 1635 when Japanese were forbidden to leave their country.
Sure, we no longer live in the times of Confucius, Mencius, or Hsun-Tzu, nor in the days of the Taika Reform (sixth to seventh century), the Tokugawa Bakufu (1603-1867), or the Iwakura Mission (1871-1873).(9) The value of learning, nevertheless, is still there, deeply rooted in the minds of post-Confucian citizens.