Baldwin I


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Baldwin I

, Latin emperor of Constantinople
Baldwin I (bôlˈdwĭn), 1171–1205, 1st Latin emperor of Constantinople (1204–5). The count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX), he was a leader in the Fourth Crusade (see Crusades). After the seizure of Constantinople (1204), the Crusaders elected him emperor (see Constantinople, Latin Empire of). He was captured (1205) in battle by the Bulgarians and died in captivity, probably by poison. He was succeeded by his brother, Henry of Flanders.

Baldwin I

, Latin king of Jerusalem
Baldwin I (Baldwin of Boulogne), 1058?–1118, Latin king of Jerusalem (1100–1118), brother and successor of Godfrey of Bouillon, whom he accompanied on the First Crusade (see Crusades). Separating from the main army after the successful siege of Nicaea, Baldwin followed Tancred into Cilicia and seized (1097) Tarsus from him. He wrested (1097) Edessa from the Muslims and as count of Edessa defended the city until elected ruler of Jerusalem. His election marked the triumph of the military faction of the Crusaders over the ecclesiastical faction. Taking the title of king, he consolidated the Latin states of the East. With the help of crusading fleets from the West and, more important, the Genoese and the Venetians, to whom he made large concessions, he gained possession of the chief ports of Palestine. He helped the Latin rulers of Antioch, Edessa, and Tripoli against the Muslims and fought against the Egyptians. He died on his return from an expedition into Egypt. His cousin, Baldwin II, succeeded him.
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Baldwin I

1058--1118, crusader and first king of Jerusalem (1100--18), who captured Acre (1104), Beirut (1109), and Sidon (1110)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Immediately before he has described the Second Battle of Ramla (1102), fought by Baldwin I against the forces of Fatimid Egypt, an engagement which is used as a contrast in the passage quoted above.
Maxwell shows that Baldwin is the "literary conscience, touchstone, and pinup" for this generation's activists, connecting a black queer-led movement with a black queer writer whose voice reaches across generations.
Under its new charter, Baldwin is striving to become more marketing-driven.
The concerted effort by Military Intelligence to obliterate the early civil liberties campaign of the NCLB and Roger Baldwin is striking indeed.
Bieber also took to social media previously to say that Baldwin is "the best wife ever" and that Gomez would always be just a thing of the past.
Even if Magnum should win the primary, attract the support of the Republican National Committee, and raise the campaign funds necessary to contend, Baldwin is still expected to win the general election, says Robin Brand, vice president for campaigns and elections at the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, a nonpartisan group in Washington, D.C., that raises money for gay and lesbian candidates across the country.
Mrs Baldwin is due to resume her evidence on Thursday, when the judge said she would hopefully be fully recovered.
Baldwin is a member of the Chicago Stock Exchange and holds two seats on the Exchange as well.
Stephen Baldwin is set to star in the upcoming film alongside Jean Garcia, Uson, Cesar Montano, Alvin Anson, and musical duo and twins Jessie and Christian Perkins.
At the young age of 37, Baldwin is already a seasoned politician.
As he portrays himself in Notes, Baldwin is a "son" in many senses of the word, and he uses these autobiographical reflections to organize multiple identifications, emulations, and differentiations.
Addressing the important question of Baldwin's female narrator Tish, Scott asks whether or not "Baldwin is simply exploiting a woman's voice in order to celebrate love for the black male and black manhood." Drawing on a range of criticism and interviews, Scott examines Baldwin's complicated articulation of sexual difference before discussing the novel's conflation of sacred and secular language.
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