Balei

Balei

 

city in Chita Oblast, RSFSR; located at the foot of the Borshchovochnyi Ridge, on the Unda River (Amur basin), 55 km south of the Priiskovaia railroad station (on the Trans-Siberian Railway). Population, 28,000 (1967). It is an important gold-mining center with mines, open-cut mines, and ore-concentration factories. There are medical and pedagogical schools. Balei arose on the site of the mining settlement of Novotroitsk; it became a city in 1938.

References in periodicals archive ?
(3) The Besisi, as reported by Skeat and Blagden (1906, i:510), kept a hierarchy of positions, namely batin, jinang, jukrah, penghulu balei, and panglima.
Avraham Azulai, Introduction, Balei Bris Avraham, quoted in 1 Hanina ben-Menahem et.
(8.) Diclehan Orhan, Sevim Balei, Ozgur Deren, Eda Gulen Utine, Ahmet Basaran, Gulsev Kale-Prenatally Diagnosed Lethal Type Larsen-like Syndrome associated with Bifid Tongue-Turkish Journal of Pediatrics 2008.
(46) Personal observation of Ngaju ritual, 1996; Pascal Couderc, personal communication, 2004; James Jemut Masing, The coming of the Gods: An Iban invocatory chant (Timang Gawai) of the Balei River region, Sarawak, vol.
The potential for low-sulphidation epithermal gold-(silver) deposits in the Mesozoic rift zones of northeastern Mongolia is shown by the existence of the Balei district only 180 km from the Mongolian frontier in Transbaikalia, southern Russia.
In the EETS edition of the play, Mark Eccles glosses the word bales as a "rod" or "scourge." (6) In his more recent student edition (Blackwell), Greg Walker specifies further, translating the word as a "scourges" or a "whip." (7) The more common variant baleys comes from the Old French baleis (nom.
In the A text, for instance, Dame Study's words to Piers do not necessarily carry a spiritual connotation but do uphold the idea of an instrument of educational discipline: "Gramer for girles I garte ferst write, / And bet hum wip a baleis but yif pei wolde lerne.
(16) This example approaches the most overtly spiritual use of the word in the poem: God "teaches" his wayward children with pestilence, poverty, physical affliction, and with "bittre baleises." Langland tends to use the word bales (or baleis) to describe an instrument to punish naughty or errant children, allowing the allegory itself to suggest the instrument's sacred dimension.