Balistidae


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Related to Balistidae: triggerfish
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Balistidae

 

(triggerfishes), a family of fishes of the order Tet-raodontiformes. The tall, laterally compressed body reaches a length of about 60 cm and is covered with large, bony, imbricate scales. The first spine of the anterior dorsal fin is thick and is locked in place vertically by the second spine. The two spines of the ventral fins fuse to form a single spine.

Triggerfishes obtain food by breaking off pieces of coral and crushing the shells of mollusks, sea urchins, and crabs with their powerful teeth, which resemble cutting pliers. There also are a number of herbivorous species. The 11 genera of triggerfishes embrace about 30 species, which are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical seas. The fishes lead a solitary mode of existence and are very slow-moving. The gray triggerfish (Balistes capriscus) is found in the Mediterranean, the eastern Atlantic, the coastal waters of the western Atlantic, and the Black Sea. The flesh is poisonous.

REFERENCES

Svetovidov, A. N. Ryby Chernogo moría. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
Nikol’skii, G. V. Chastnaia ikhtiologiia, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1971.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They possess a typical balistoid (Balistidae, Monacanthidae, and the Ostraciidae) hyoid arch with no hypertrophy of the first branchiostegal ray or the associated hyohyoideus abductor muscle, and the pectoral girdle is unmodified relative to other file fishes (Matsuura 1979; Tyler 1980).
La familia Balistidae comprende unas 40 especies en todo el mundo, 10 de ellas se conocen en aguas colombianas, resaltando Canthidermis maculata y Melichthys niger por estar presentes en el Caribe y el Pacifico (Acero, Mejia, & Santos-Acevedo, 2002).
19.7 Brown rock shrimp Sicyonia brevirostris 38.5 Smoothhead scorpionfish Scorpaena calcarata 34.0 Seabob Xiphopenaeus kroyeri 31.9 Spotted hake Urophycis regia 31.2 Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus 3.5 Bull shark Carcharhinus leucas 30.5 Spanish sardine Sardinella aurita 29.9 Bighead searobin Prionotus tribulus 28.7 Triggerfish/FNefish Balistidae 28.3 (family) Lefteye flounder (genus) Paralichthys spp.
Oocyte development and ovarian maturation of the black triggerfish, Melichthys niger (Actinopterygii: Balistidae) in Sao Pedro e Sao Paulo Archipelago, Brazil.
Littlehead porgy Calamus proridens Gulf toadfish Opsanus beta Great hammerhead Sphyrna mokarran Chain dogfish Scyliorhinus retifer Short bigeye Pristigenys alta Ocean triggerfish Canthidermis sufflamen Squirrelfish Holocentrus adscensionis Cubbyu Pareques umbrosus Sand tilefish Malacanthus plumieri Night shark Carcharhinus signatus Yellowmouth grouper Mycteroperca interstitialis Triggerfish (family) Balistidae Rock hind Epinephelus adscensionis Goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara Wahoo Acanthocybium solandri Reticulate moray Muraena retifera Blackbar drum Equetus iwamotoi Round scad Decapterus punctatus Hake (genus) Urophycis sp.
Species that frequent the area include surgeonfish, triggerfish (Balistidae), small carangids, porcupinefish, sea chubs, goatfish, parrotfish and puffers.
The gray triggerfish (Batistes capriscus) (family Balistidae) is widely distributed throughout the Atlantic, from Nova Scotia to Argentina and throughout the Gulf of Mexico in the western Atlantic (Briggs, 1958; in Moore, 1967) and, in the eastern Atlantic, from Ireland (Quigley et al., 1993) to southwestern Africa (Longhurst and Pauly, 1987; Kortenang et al., 1996), where tremendous increases in biomass have been observed for this species beginning in the late 1960s (Caveriviere, 1982; Ofori-Danson, 1989).
About 88% of the fishermen target reef fishes such as yellowtail snapper; triggerfish, Balistidae spp.; and parrotfish, Sparisima viride and S.
patagonicus Grey triggerfish Balistes capriscus Balistidae Jamaica weakfish Cynoscion jamaicensis Sciaenidae King weakfish Macrodon ancylodon Sciaenidae Largehead hairtail Trichiurus lepturus Trichiuridae Monkfish Lophius gastrophysus Lophiidae Namorado sandperch Pseudopercis numida Mugiloididae Pink cusk-eel Genypterus brasiliensis Ophidiidae Pink-shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis, Penaeidae F brasiliensis Rays Atlantoraja cyclophora, Rajidae A.
Similarly absent (or rare) were larvae from other recreational and commercially important species such Coryphaena hippurus (Coryphaenidae), Rachycentron canadum (Rachycentridae), Balistes capriscus (Balistidae), Lobotes surinamensis (Lobotidae), Chaetodipterus faber (Ephippidae), and Mugil cephalus (Mugilidae), all of which spawn in coastal or offshore waters of Alabama.