Ballou, Hosea

Ballou, Hosea,

1771–1852, American clergyman, foremost among expositors of Universalism in the United States, b. Cheshire co., N.H. From 1818 until his death he was pastor of the Second Universalist Society in Boston. One of the founders (1819) of the Universalist Magazine, he was its editor until 1828; from 1830 he edited the Universalist Expositor. His works include Notes on the Parables (1804), A Treatise on the Atonement (1805), and a number of hymns.
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Ballou, Hosea

(1771–1853) Universalist clergyman, theologian; born in Richmond, N.H. Raised in poverty, brought up a Baptist, and self-educated, he was for many years a circuit-riding preacher in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. He settled in Boston, Mass., in 1817 where he helped found the Universalist Church, edited Universalist publications, and developed a liberal theology that denied original sin and the full deity of Christ. From 1827 until his death he was pastor of the Second Universalist Society of Boston.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.