Balmer jump

Balmer jump

[′bȯl·mər ‚jəmp]
(spectroscopy)
The sudden decrease in the intensity of the continuous spectrum of hydrogen at the Balmer limit. Also known as Balmer discontinuity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Also of interest is the so-called Balmer jump at a near-ultraviolet wavelength of 364.7 nm, just past the blue end of the visible spectrum.
One potential complication, cautions Napoleao: the sensitivity of most commercially available CCD cameras declines steeply with wavelength at the ultraviolet end of the spectrum, and some CCDs may be unable to straddle the Balmer jump. If your chip can operate around 370 nm, Damineli stresses the importance of calibrating your spectrometer's sensitivity to light of various wavelengths.
Emission Lines to Watch Balmer jump * -- 350-380 nm doubly ionized neon Ne III 386.8 nm doubly ionized iron Fe III 465.6 nm singly ionized nitrogen N II 575.5 nm doubly ionized sulfur S III 631.2 nm doubly ionized argon Ar III 713.5 nm Source: Augusto Damineli * A discontinuity in the continuum rather than an emission line Marooned nearly halfway between the equator and the North Pole, senior editor JOSHUA ROTH can only vicariously experience Eta Carinae's long-awaited antics.