Baltic states

(redirected from Baltic Soviet Republics)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Baltic states,

the countries of EstoniaEstonia
, Estonian Eesti, officially Republic of Estonia, republic (2005 est. pop. 1,333,000), 17,505 sq mi (45,339 sq km). It borders on the Baltic Sea in the west; the gulfs of Riga and Finland (both arms of the Baltic) in the southwest and north, respectively; Latvia
..... Click the link for more information.
, LatviaLatvia
, Latvian Latvija, officially Republic of Latvia, republic (2011 provisional pop. 2,067,887), 24,590 sq mi (63,688 sq km), north central Europe. It borders on Estonia in the north, Lithuania in the south, the Baltic Sea with the Gulf of Riga in the west, Russia in
..... Click the link for more information.
, and LithuaniaLithuania
, Lithuanian Lietuva, officially Republic of Lithuania, republic (2005 est. pop. 3,597,000), 25,174 sq mi (65,201 sq km), N central Europe. Lithuania borders on the Baltic Sea in the west, Latvia in the north, Belarus in the east and southeast, Poland in the
..... Click the link for more information.
, bordering on the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea. Formed in 1918, they remained independent republics until their involuntary incorporation in 1940 into the USSR. They regained their independence in Sept., 1991, and virtually all Russian troops were withdrawn by Aug., 1994. Finland is usually classed with the Scandinavian rather than with the Baltic states. See also Baltic provincesBaltic provinces,
historic regions of Courland, Livonia, Estonia, and Ingermanland bordering on the eastern coast of the Baltic Sea. They were conquered by Russia from Sweden in the 18th cent. and made into provinces.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) According to Zubkova, Pribaltika i Kreml', 256, the Baltic Soviet republics after the death of Stalin appeared to be a "tamed but not loyal" region.
For Bugai the question of guilt for the people's tragedy is obvious: after all, he contends, the governments of the Baltic Soviet republics themselves called on Moscow for help against their local enemies (27-28).
According to her final interpretation (which actually merits another book to prove the argument), after Stalin's death the Soviet leadership faced the fact that Sovietization was doomed to failure and tried to make a "shop window" (vitrina) out of the Baltic Soviet republics.

Full browser ?