Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

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Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

(B&O), first U.S. public railroad, chartered in 1827 by a group of Baltimore businessmen to regain trans-Allegheny traffic lost to the newly opened Erie CanalErie Canal,
artificial waterway, c.360 mi (580 km) long; connecting New York City with the Great Lakes via the Hudson River. Locks were built to overcome the 571-ft (174-m) difference between the level of the river and that of Lake Erie.
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. Construction began in 1828, and the first division opened in May, 1830, between Baltimore and Ellicott's Mills, Md. Horses were the first source of power, but the successful trial run of Peter Cooper's Tom Thumb in Aug., 1830, brought the change to steam locomotives. The B&O expanded steadily and reached St. Louis in 1857. During the Civil War the railroad moved Union troops and supplies. By the end of the 19th cent. the B&O had achieved almost 5,800 mi (9,334 km) of track and connected with Chicago, Philadelphia, and New York City. By the mid-1900s it had become mainly a freight carrier. Faced with financial difficulties, the B&O was acquired by the Chesapeake & Ohio RailwayChesapeake & Ohio Railway
(C&O), former U.S. transportation company with railroad lines in eight states, Washington, D.C., and Ontario, Canada. Founded as the Louisa RR Company in Virginia in 1836, the railroad changed its name to the Virginia Central Company in 1850.
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 in 1963 and merged with it in 1965. In 1980 the combined company became part of the CSX Corporation. The B&O was the first railroad to publish a timetable, to use electric locomotives and specialty cars (e.g., dining and baggage), and to run fully air-conditioned trains.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hrastar, who researches and writes about history and worked in the aerospace industry, describes the people and events that contributed to breaking the Appalachian barrier that separated the East Coast colonies from the farmland of the Ohio country, beginning in 1750, when English colonists wanted to breach the Appalachian Mountain barrier; to creating a road from Cumberland, Maryland, to Wheeling, Virginia, to link Maryland and Ohio; to the creation of alternative routes, including the Erie Canal and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Completed by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1830, Ellicott City Station is the site of the original terminus of the first 13 miles of commercial track in America.
In 1880 Johnston Line ships started transatlantic services from Liverpool and London to Boston and other United States east coast ports in partnership with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company.
This pictorial history chronicles the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in West Virginia from the late 1800s to the 1960s through b&w photos that describe the line's locomotives, passenger and freight trains, structures, special excursions, employees, and wrecks.
Finally, in the 1820s, industrialists built the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to carry freight from the coast to the interior.
The first of the two Southern trans-Appalachian routes--the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad was underwritten in large part by the State of Maryland and by the City of Baltimore.
He is author of several volumes on railroad history, the most recent being History of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (1987) and American Railroads, second edition (1997).
Only two years after the opening of the Erie Canal the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company was incorporated.
Reflecting on the ways in which leaders shape corporate cultures, he asserts that Daniel Willard's leadership as president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from 1910 through mid-1941 helped establish a pervasive "B&O family culture." Willard's program consisted of welfare work, scientific management, the B&O Railroad Cooperative Plan, the Cooperative Traffic Program, and company boosterism.
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