Caere

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Caere

Caere (sēˈrē), ancient city of Etruria, c.30 mi (50 km) N of Rome, Italy, at the site of the modern Cerveteri. Although a few miles from the sea, it had ports at Alsium (near modern Palo) and Pyrgi (modern Santa Severa). During the 7th and 6th cent. B.C., Caere reached the period of its greatest prosperity. The cemeteries have been excavated, and the monumental tumuli have yielded vases, pottery, and other art objects, revealing much about Etruscan civilization.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Caere

 

an Etruscan city-state, now Cerveteri, Italy. According to legend, the city was founded by Pelasgian tribes and named Agylla. In 535 B.C., Carthage and Caere defeated the Phocaean fleet off the shores of Corsica. During the Gallic invasion of Italy in 390 B.C., the Roman vestal virgins took refuge in Caere with their sacred vessels. Caere was conquered by the Romans in 358 B.C.

The foundations of the Manganello temple (sixth century B.C.) have been preserved, as well as the remains of the city wall (fifth and fourth centuries B.C.) and the ruins of a Roman theater. A necropolis containing burials from the seventh to third centuries B.C. (including the Regolini-Galassi tomb) is located northwest of the city on Banditaccia Hill.

REFERENCE

Pallottino, M. The Necropolis of Cerveteri. Rome, 1957.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, a visit to the necropolis of Banditaccia in Cerveteri or that of Monterozzi in Tarquinia confirms Lawrence's view in 1927: 'there is a queer stillness, and a curious peaceful repose about the Etruscan places I have been to, quite different from the weirdness of Celtic places, the slightly repellant feeling of Rome and the old campagna, and the rather horrible feeling of the great pyramid places in Mexico, Teotihuacan and Cholula, and Mitla in the south; or the amiably idolatrous Buddha places in Ceylon.' (19) Remarkably, though, the archaeological parks of Cerveteri, Tarquinia, and Vulci have witnessed a renaissance in the last 90 years, having been well maintained and opened to a wide public through the work of the Soprintendenze.
In this final offering, the group enjoy their last few days together on the La Banditaccia farm, before reflecting on what they have learnt about themselves during their stay, and saying their goodbyes.
WEDNESDAY Second Chance Summer: Tuscany BBC Two, 9pm The group prepare for the annual autumnal olive harvest at La Banditaccia farm, but interest soon wanes after the scale and arduous reality of the task hits home and the challenge of the harvest begins to split the camp.