Banister


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banister

[′ban·ə·stər]
(building construction)
A handrail for a staircase.

Banister

A slender pillar turned on a lathe, used to support the handrail of a stair.

baluster, banister

baluster, 3
baluster, 1
1. One of a number of short vertical members, often circular in section, used to support a stair handrail or a coping.
2. (pl.) A balustrade.
3. The roll forming the side of an Ionic capital; a bolster, pulvinus.

banister

1. A handrail for a staircase.
2. A baluster.
References in periodicals archive ?
FRESH BREWED START Banister moved to Sarasota from Kansas City and found only one deficiency.
Currently, Banister is Tyson Foods' (TSN) board lead independent director as well as as trustee of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology foundation.
Banister stayed home with flu-like symptoms and agonizing ankle pain that caused him to collapse.
With the transaction, Quanta will gain the opportunity to strategically broaden its Canadian mainline pipeline services portfolio throughout the country, the company noted, adding that it would be able to provide Banister customers with access to its energy infrastructure resources.
Banister further said that the way he looks at it is by considering the alternatives, adding that one of the pleasures of his life apart from running has been walking, but what is it anyway.
POINTING a gun as he threatens to shoot a terrified shopkeeper, violent serial thug George Banister is caught on camera.
Is it possible that Australian politician Stephanie Banister is so blissfully ignorant that she fails to understand the most basic tenets of Islam?
Deborah Gould, prosecuting, told how Burnett had approached Zimmerframe user Mrs Banister, 66, as she went shopping on May 7, 2007.
Deborah Gould, prosecuting, told how Burnett had approached Mrs Banister, 66, as she went shopping.
My vision is to use Our world-class operational processes coupled with new, sophisticated technologies to unlock the 3 1/2 billion barrels of resources we have on our books in a safe and environmentally friendly way," Banister says.
He felt he could relate to Banister and more accurately depict the runner's struggles than someone with no running experience.
The jury heard from forensic scientist Neil Garton, who said it was possible the marks on the boy's head could have been caused by contact with sections of the banister at Holdsworth's house.