Banjarese

Banjarese

 

people living primarily in Indonesia, in the south and southeast of the island of Kalimantan (population approximately 1.7 million by a 1965 estimate), and also in Malaya (population approximately 100,000). The language of the Banjarese is closely related to the Malay language. The religion is Islam. The chief occupations are farming (floodplain rice and the export crops rubber and pepper) and fishing. Crafts (jewelry, etc.) are highly developed. The Banjarese are also engaged in diamond mining. Capitalistic relationships are developing among the Banjarese, although communal elements are retained in the countryside. The culture has been subjected to considerable Javanese influence.

REFERENCE

Narody lugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
While resistance to the move to independence was most notable in then South Borneo--especially among Ngaju Dayaks, who feared that they would be incorporated into an Islamic Banjarese state (Miles 1976:112-114; Harwell 2000:53-54)--in the part of West Kalimantan where I have worked, Dayaks in the 1980s also recalled their opposition to the resumption of Malay rule.
However, in June 1707 the Banjarese destroyed fortifications that the English had started to construct, along with two vessels, and the English departed in defeat (Willi 1922:10-17).
Malays include those who have settled in the country (mainly in the Malay Peninsula) since the 19th century such as Javanese, the Banjarese, Boyanese, Bugis, Bajau and Minangkabau.
18) During fieldwork in Banjarmasin, many people stressed the still very strong patriarchal character of Banjarese Islam and society; for example, polygamy is widespread.
However, why the Madurese community, which was small compared to other immigrant groups, especially the Javanese and Banjarese, became the sole target of Dayak hostility is not entirely clear.
Mangun argued that the Catholic Church should not dream of converting Indonesian ethnic groups who are known as Muslims, such as Madurese, Sundanese, Acehnese, Banjarese, and Minangese (Mangunwijaya, Memuliakan Allah, mengangkat Manusia, p.
This sociolinguistic study investigated the hypothesis that the Indonesian language (IL) is encroaching upon Banjarese Malay (BM), focusing on the fact that these two related languages form a diglossic situation, whereby IL performs the high function and BM performs the low function.
These demands were partly a response to the Darul Islam movement to create an Islamic state, which was widely supported by the Banjarese people who dominated the existing South Kalimantan province.
In S village there were also Banjarese though their number is quite small compared with the Javanese-Malays.
At close inspection, however, a further six have to be eliminated as evidence for a close link because they do occur in Malayic languages, such as Minangkabau (ma-aru "to stir food", buyah "foam"), Banjarese (bilak "open"), Than (mulung "sago") and Salako in West Kalimantan (amuukng "sago", bariha "to have diarrhoea "); the relation between BM alapan "part of the deceased's personal possessions which is given as an act of piety" and Bacan Malay alapi "to take something on behalf of another" should also be tested against various other reflexes of Proto-Malayic *alap "to take".
Central Kalimantan was formed a few months after the other three in 1957; the main reason for separate provincial status for this isolated and lightly populated region appears to have been the fact that the population was mainly Dayak, rather than Banjarese.
The book describes the shifting constellations of elites in the subsequent period: moderate Banjarese in the 1950s, radical Javanese pejuang in the early 1960s, Banjarese connected with timber in the 1970s and the Jakarta-based peranakan Chinese timber magnates in the 1980s.