William B. Bankhead National Forest

(redirected from Bankhead National Forest)

William B. Bankhead National Forest

Address:PO Box 278
Double Springs, AL 35553

Phone:205-489-5111
Web: www.fs.fed.us/r8/alabama/forests
Size: 180,581 acres.
Location:Northwest Alabama. Accessible by US 278; AL 5, 74, and 195. Nearby cities/towns include Decatur, Haleyville, Jasper, and Russellville.
Facilities:Campgrounds,dispersed camping, trails, picnic sites, ballfields, shooting range, boat ramps.
Activities:Camping, hunting, fishing, boating, swimming, hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, ORV riding.
Special Features:25,000-acre Sipsey Wilderness, the largest wilderness area east of the Mississippi River; Sipsey Fork, Alabama's only designated Wild and Scenic River; Lewis Smith Lake, excellent for bass and bluegill fishing.

See other parks in Alabama.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a survey of Borden Creek in the Sipsey Fork within Bankhead National Forest revealed that these fishes are still present in the Black Warrior River basin.
One wonders what kind of planning went into these silvicultural practices." Evans notes that some regions, including northern Alabama, have abandoned pine plantations because of the beetle problem, as has Alabama's Bankhead National Forest:
Several headwater tributaries of the Sipsey Fork, Black Warrior River drainage, originating and flowing through Bankhead National Forest (Winston County, Alabama) were carefully searched for mussels between 14-17 March 1994.
Cerulean Warblers occurred in three disjunct locations: one in Bankhead National Forest, Lawrence County; and two in Jackson County along Larkin Fork and in Walls of Jericho along Hurricane Creek.
They tend to be obsessed, like Lamar Marshall who learned how to type at age 43 to publish his own magazine in defense of the hardwood trees around him in the Bankhead National Forest i n Alabama, which is rapidly becoming a pine plantation.
After one season of trapping efforts in the Bankhead National Forest and surrounding areas in 2002, preliminary results indicate populations are doing well in some areas, but that dense populations are spotty in distribution.