Bannock

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Bannock

(băn`ək), Native North Americans who formerly ranged over wide territory of the N Great Plains and into the foothills of the Rocky Mts. They were concentrated in S Idaho. Their language belonged to the Uto-Aztecan branch of the Aztec-Tanoan linguistic stock (see Native American languagesNative American languages,
languages of the native peoples of the Western Hemisphere and their descendants. A number of the Native American languages that were spoken at the time of the European arrival in the New World in the late 15th cent.
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). Their culture was typical of the Plains tribes (see under Natives, North AmericanNatives, North American,
peoples who occupied North America before the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th cent. They have long been known as Indians because of the belief prevalent at the time of Columbus that the Americas were the outer reaches of the Indies (i.e.
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). In 1869, Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho was established for them and for the Northern ShoshoneShoshone
or Shoshoni
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Shoshonean group of the Uto-Aztecan branch of the Aztec-Tanoan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). In the early 19th cent.
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, with whom the Bannock were closely associated. Loss of hunting lands, disappearance of the buffalo, and lack of assistance from the U.S. government led to a Bannock uprising in 1878, which was suppressed. Most Bannock and the Northern Shoshone live at the Fort Hall Reservation. In 1990 there were about 3,500 Shoshone-Bannock in the United States.

Bibliography

See B. D. Madsen, The Bannock of Idaho (1958); R. F. Murphy, Shoshone-Bannock Subsistence and Society (1960).

References in periodicals archive ?
Sit with an Elder, drink a cup of hot tea, eat some jam covered bannock and share stories with them.
Bannocks are a traditional Scottish skillet bread consisting primarily of oat and white flour.
7As each pan-full of bannocks is done, place them in a folded tea towel to keep warm and continue cooking through.
There at the family celebration were great-greatgrandmother Mary Pittman, 86, daughter Rita Purser, 62, her daughter Dawn Bannocks, 43, her daughter Gemma Bannocks, 21, and her baby Ellie-Jane.
First, baker Colin Kay put up a sign saying that his bannocks were the only ones still made locally.
There they were received as outsiders by the Shoshone and Bannock peoples.