Banyoro


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Banyoro

 

a people living near Lake Albert in the Republic of Uganda. Population, about 300,000 (1967, estimate). Their language belongs to the Bantu family. In language and culture the Banyoro are closely related to the Batoro and Banyankole peoples. The Banyoro retain local traditional beliefs; Christianity is also spreading. In the 15th century the Banyoro created the Banyoro state, which became part of the British protectorate of Uganda in 1896. The chief occupations of the Banyoro are agriculture and cattle raising.

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Tribal disputes have largely occurred between the indigenous Banyoro tribe and the recently settled Bakiga from Rwanda, although historically their roots can be traced back to the region.
In Runyakitara, a collection of language varieties spoken by the Banyankore, Banyoro, Batooro and Bakiga of Western Uganda and also the Bahaya, Banyambo and others of Northern Tanzania, obuntu refers to the human characteristics of generosity, consideration and humaneness towards others.
Women and children have no say according to the Banyoro's custom and he always made sure that this custom was strictly observed in his household.
(43) Isingoma Kahwa Henri, "La notion Traditionnelle de la Communaute en Afrique Noire et son intergrations dans la Vie Ecclesiale (Cas de Banyoro en Republique du Zaire)," (Master's diss., Bangui, 1989), 31.
For instance, among the Bantu--especially the Banyankore, Bakiga, Batorro, Banyoro, and Bagisu--there are sounds made to indicate disgust, defiance, annoyance, accent, joy, amazement, and the like, which are untranslatable into English or other languages.
I wonder how the Canadian federation would handle such an issue?" On the other hand, these African elites almost never asked, "How did the Banyoro, the Wolof, the Igbo or the Kikuyu govern themselves before colonisation?" In the words of the Western philosopher Edmund Burke, "People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors" (Mazrui 2002: 20).
Van Sertima tells of the Banyoro surgeons in East Africa who were performing Cesarean sections with a 100 percent success rate back in the 1800s.
Chief Awich Aboki Lutanymoi was also wrongfully detained twice, in 1901 and 1902 (for refusing to surrender Banyoro refugees who had fled to Acholiland after the capture of Kabalega in 1899).
Four districts were purposively selected for the study, one in an urban area, the capital city of Uganda, Kampala, two in ethnically Bantu districts, Luwero (Baganda) and Hoima (Banyoro), and one non-Bantu district, Lira (Lango).