bar chart

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bar chart

[′bär ‚chärt]
(statistics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Bar Chartclick for a larger image
Fig. 2 Bar Chart. A diagrammatic display of a frequency distribution in which bars of equal width represent each category, with the length of each bar being proportional to the number or frequency of occurrence for each category. In the above example, the annual student loan default in $US is represented for the years 1981-1990.

bar chart

a diagrammatic method for displaying FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS, in which bars of equal width are drawn to represent each category, with the length of each bar being proportional to the number, or frequency of occurrence, of each category (see Fig. 2). Bar charts are used not because they present different information than can be displayed in tables, but because they can display it in a way that is easier to understand. See also HISTOGRAM.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

bar chart

A graphical representation of information in the form of bars. See business graphics.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this class activity the graph shows that there is no association between the uses of activities and the type of teachers, X2(1, N= 40) =10.889, p less than .05.Private-sector English Language teachers preferred Conversation activities in their classrooms, as displayed in figure 3: The Bar-chart shows that 35 % Public sector teachers are inclined in using Conversation activities, while 90 % Private sector teachers are interested in using the same activities.
In this class activity the graph shows that there is no association between the uses of Activities and the type of teachers, X2(1, N= 40) =9.800, p less than .05.Private-sector English Language teachers preferred Pronunciation activities in their classrooms, as displayed in figure 4: the Bar-chart shows that 15 % Public sector teachers are inclined in using Pronunciation activities, while 85 % Private sector teachers are interested in using the same activities.
In this class activity the graph shows that there is strong association between the uses of activities and the type of teachers, X2(1, N= 40) =.027, p greater than .05.Public as well as private- sector English Language teachers preferred Transformational drills in their classrooms, as displayed in figure 5: The Bar-chart shows that 95 % Public sector teachers are interested in using Transformational drills, while 90 % Private sector teachers are inclined to use the same activities.
Plot a bar-chart of all the [[SIGMA].sub.(i = 1).sup.n] [[[NScD.sub.k,p,i]].sup.2].
MP charts were introduced by Fuchs and Benyamini (16) and position the baseline of a miniature bar-chart of scaled deviations at the vertical magnitude of the respective [T.sup.2.sub.Mk] or [T.sup.2.sub.Dk] statistic.