Bard, John

Bard, John,

1716–99, American physician, persuaded New York to establish on Bedloe Island its first quarantine station and was himself the first health officer. He wrote on yellow fever, malignant pleurisy, and other subjects, and was the first president of the Medical Society of the State of New York. His more noted son, Samuel Bard, 1742–1821, was the leader in founding in 1768 the first medical school in New York City, affiliated with King's College, and became professor of the theory and practice of physic. In 1792, when the school was reorganized, he was made dean of the faculty. He also aided in founding the New York Hospital and the New York Dispensary. He was very popular and successful in his practice, particularly in obstetrics, and his manual on Midwifery (1807), which went through many editions, was long standard. He wrote an excellent treatise on sheep breeding in A Guide for Young Shepherds (1811).

Bard, John

(1716–99) physician; born in Burlington, N.J. After practicing medicine in Philadelphia, he moved to New York City (1746). He performed the first recorded dissection of a cadaver in the United States for the purpose of instruction (1750) and the first surgical delivery of a live fetus (1759). He was a precursor of the public sanitation movement in New York City, advocating measures to prevent the spread of yellow fever.
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Board members exiting included John Bard, John O'Brien and Raymond Troubh; new board members include William Aziz, Brent Baird, Albrecht Bellstedt, Peter Dey, Edward Hannah and G.
The PSAs also include PVA members Lisa Bard, John Bollinger, Louis Irvin, and Harley Thomas, and nonmembers Nancy Starnes mad Bob Herman.