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bard,

in Wales, term originally used to refer to the order of minstrel-poets who composed and recited the poems that celebrated the feats of Celtic chieftains and warriors. The term bard in present-day usage has become synonymous with poet, particularly a revered poet.
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bard

1. 
a. (formerly) one of an ancient Celtic order of poets who recited verses about the exploits, often legendary, of their tribes
b. (in modern times) a poet who wins a verse competition at a Welsh eisteddfod
2. Archaic or literary any poet, esp one who writes lyric or heroic verse or is of national importance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite writers like Christopher Marlowe and Bernard Shaw, the Bard of Avon will never gather dust on forgotten shelves in libraries.
The University of Oregon will kick off its theater season and give a fund-raising campaign a boost Friday with help from the Bard of Avon and a guy from ``Avenue Q.''
One of the few occasions when the Bard of Avon is more appropriate than Rabbie.
Brian Pollitt says Alastair Down is guilty of failing to give the Bard of Avon his full due
Whoever the Bard of Avon was, his take on the past need not be definitive.
All literature, whether written before or after Shakespeare, must be measured against the literary yardstick left behind by the Bard of Avon (and inevitably found wanting).
He disapproved of blues and jazz, preferring Western classical music, and his favorite author was the Bard of Avon. Indeed, Randolph (a Southerner by birth) picked up his arresting "Oxford-style" English accent learning to recite Shakespeare with the help of a tutor before World War I, when he performed Shakespearean roles in amateur theatre in Harlem.
I suspect Shakespeare would consider both of these books to be "much ado about nothing" for the Bard of Avon was a practical, pragmatic man of the theatre who probably cared little for historical accuracy; all he wanted was a good, theatrically exciting fight.
The Bard of Avon might seem an unlikely candidate to have his works presented in animation, but half a dozen of his most famous plays have been adapted in this manner with admirable results.
The Restoration sought to refine the barbaric yawp of the Bard of Avon. In the early 19th century, the much admired Thomas Bowdler presented his Family Shakespeare in which he expurgated anything that would be unfit "to be read aloud by a gentleman to a company of ladies."
Ben Elton's wry sitcom about William Shakespeare is back for a second series, with the grumpy Bard of Avon continuing his quest to become a famous playwright.
It quotes Barnum's memoirs: "Americans appreciate the immortal Bard of Avon as keenly as do their brethren the Mother Country (a Mother of whom we are all justly proud) and I greatly desired to honour the New World by erecting this invaluable relic in its commercial metropolis.