barite

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barite

(bâr`īt),

barytes

(bərī`tēz) [New Lat., from barium], or

heavy spar,

a white, yellow, blue, red, or colorless mineral. It is a sulfate of barium, BaSO4, found in nature as tabular crystals or in granular or massive form and has a high specific gravity. The mineral is widely distributed throughout the world. It often occurs in veins with lead and zinc minerals. It is insoluble in water, and this property is made use of in testing for the sulfatesulfate,
chemical compound containing the sulfate (SO4) radical. Sulfates are salts or esters of sulfuric acid, H2SO4, formed by replacing one or both of the hydrogens with a metal (e.g., sodium) or a radical (e.g., ammonium or ethyl).
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 radical. It is practically insoluble under ordinary conditions in all the usual chemical reagents. Barite is used as a commercial source of barium and many of its compounds. Ground barite is used as a filler in the manufacture of linoleum, oilcloth, paper and textile manufacturing, rubber, and plastics. Finely ground barite is used to make a thixotropic mud for sealing oil wells during drilling. Prime white, a bleached barite, is used as a pigment in white paint but is not as satisfactory as blanc fixe, a chemically precipitated barium sulfate, or lithopone, a mixture of barium sulfate, zinc sulfide, and zinc oxide.
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barite

[′ba‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
BaSO4 A white, yellow, or colorless orthorhombic mineral occurring in tabular crystals, granules, or compact masses; specific gravity is 4.5; used in paints and drilling muds and as a source of barium chemicals; the principal ore of barium. Also known as baryte; barytine; cawk; heavy spar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

barite

A mineral used in concrete as an aggregate, esp. for the construction of high-density radiation shielding; also called barium sulfate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barite (BaS[O.sub.4]) is a widespread mineral in diverse geological settings including sedimentary and hydrothermal ones (Hanor 2000; Kontak et al.
Stage III marked the end of hydrothermal ore-forming epoch and was characterized by quartz + barite + calcite + bitumen.
In particular, the H-O isotopic composition of stage [I.sub.1] barites and the C-O isotopic compositions of calcites from the NE-trending tectonic belt show that the metallogenic Fluid A of the Huize Pb-Zn deposit originates from deep-seated sources and is rich in lighter C and O isotopes.
Barite was commonly found in association, though not in good crystal specimens, and calcite formed about 10% of the vein filling in the area near the old engine shaft.
Chris Tucker Minerals of Montana had some fine barite specimens from near Myers, Treasure County, Montana; they bear some similarities to the dark golden barite from Elk Creek, South Dakota.
Only in a few specimens is barite or rarely cerrusite found in association.
In 1916 the Sudharzer Schwerspatwerke Max Doring ("Max Doring Southern Harz Barite Company"), the first commercial firm ever to become involved with manganese mining at Ilfeld, leased the old mines from the Count's Mining Office.
The Haile Moor and Beckermet mines produced a substantial number of fine specimens of hematite, quartz, calcite and barite. Unlike in the other mines, however, the mining company considered mineral specimens to be company property, not a miner's perquisite.
Nevada is quickly becoming famous among mineral collectors for its contemporary production of fine, crystallized barite specimens.
Most of the pieces are in the miniature to small cabinet size, often growing on drusy-quartz-covered, blocky barite crystals in a very aesthetic manner.