Barkis


Also found in: Idioms.

Barkis

warmhearted but taciturn husband of Peggoty. [Br. Lit: David Copperfield]
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Barkis) to say - he being, as I observed in a former chapter, of a phlegmatic temperament, and not at all conversational - I offered him a cake as a mark of attention, which he ate at one gulp, exactly like an elephant, and which made no more impression on his big face than it would have done on an elephant's.
Barkis, always leaning forward, in his slouching way, on the footboard of the cart with an arm on each knee.
Barkis. He made up his mouth as if to whistle, but he didn't whistle.
Barkis?' For I thought he wanted something else to eat, and had pointedly alluded to that description of refreshment.
Barkis, after a long interval of reflection, 'all the apple parsties, and doos all the cooking, do she?'
If you was writin' to her, p'raps you'd recollect to say that Barkis was willin'; would you?'
Barkis,' I said, faltering a little at the idea of my being far away from it then, and could give your own message so much better.'
"Barkis" was so gentle and so "willin'," however, that Rose was ashamed to be afraid to ride him; so she had learned, that she might surprise Dr.
One look was enough, and with a cry of delight, Rose was off down the road as fast as Barkis could go.
Fired by this ambition, she startled Barkis by a sharp cut, and still more bewildered him by leaving him to his own guidance down the steep, stony road.
She was up and away as she spoke, doing her best to efface the memory of her downfall by sitting very erect, elbows down, head well up, and taking the motion of the pony as Barkis cantered along as easily as a rocking-chair.
I sprained my ankle when I tumbled off of Barkis, and it gets worse and worse; though I've done all I know to cure it and hide it, so it shouldn't trouble anyone," whispered Rose, knitting her brows with pain, as she prepared to descend, wishing her uncle would take her instead of her bundles.