Barmakids


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Barmakids

(bär`məkĭdz') or

Barmecides

(bär`məsīdz'), Persian-descended religious family from KhorasanKhorasan
or Khurasan
, region and former province (1991 pop. 6,013,200), c.125,000 sq mi (323,750 sq km), NE Iran. Mashhad is the chief city; other cities include Sabzevar, Bojnurd, and Neyshabur. It is mainly mountainous and arid.
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. They served as viziers to the AbbasidAbbasid
or Abbaside
, Arab family descended from Abbas, the uncle of Muhammad. The Abbasids held the caliphate from 749 to 1258, but they were recognized neither in Spain nor (after 787) W of Egypt.
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 caliphs in the 8th cent. Khalid ibn Barmak, d. 782?, supported the revolution that brought about Abbasid rule. He was given certain ministerial powers, such as tax collecting and control over the army; later, he was appointed governor of FarsFars
or Farsistan
, province (1991 pop. 3,543,828), c.51,500 sq mi (133,400 sq km), SW Iran. Shiraz is the capital and chief city, located in an oasis occupying a valley c.6 mi (10 km) wide and 20 mi (32 km) long. The province is largely mountainous.
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 and governor of Tabaristan. Yahya, d. 805, son of Khalid, became secretary to the caliph's son, Harun ar-RashidHarun ar-Rashid
[Arab.,=Aaron the Upright], c.764–809, 5th and most famous Abbasid caliph (786–809). He succeeded his brother Musa al-Hadi, fourth caliph, a year after the death of his father, Mahdi, the third caliph.
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. Yahya and Harun were imprisoned by the caliph's successor, Musa al-Hadi, who died soon afterward. Harun became caliph and made Yahya chief administrator. Yahya's sons, Jafar, d. 803, and al-Fadl, d. 808, also became administrators during the reign of Harun. Jafar headed various interior departments. Al-Fadl eventually assumed his father's central duties and was appointed governor of Khorasan. However, by 800 the Barmakids' power and status were rapidly declining. Jafar was executed in 803; Yahya and al-Fadl died in prison.
References in periodicals archive ?
These Hindu-Shahis were followed by another dynasty called the Barmakids, famous because Ayurvedic physicians from their region set up the "Bimaristan" or hospital for Harun al-Rashid, the Caliph at Baghdad.
92) "Barmakids" would have been preferable, while Yusuf (vol.
Many vizier families in early Islamicate states were originally of Persian origin, as noted above, having been assimilated after the Umayyad conquest and having joined the ruling structure (and even more so after the Abbasid revolution, which was supported by some powerful families of Persian descent such as the Barmakids).
Beginning in Baghdad, it looks at the local tradition: Mada'in, the rise of the Mu'tazila, the time following the fall of the Barmakids, divided empire, and civil war.
Among them are discussions of the cities Baghdad and Basra and of important people such as al-Baqullani in theology, the three brothers called the Banu Musa in the sciences, the Abbasid chancellor family Barmakids, and Batazid Bastami in the mystical tradition.
A complete list of the articles in this volume is as follows: Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim, 'Islam and Tibet: Cultural Interactions--An Introduction'; Anna Akasoy, 'Tibet in Islamic Geography and Cartography: A Survey of Arabic and Persian Sources'; Kevin van Bladel, 'The Bactrian Background of the Barmakids'; Assadullah Souren Melikian-Chirvani, 'Iran to Tibet'; Dan Martin, 'Greek and Islamic Medicines' Historical Contact with Tibet: A Reassessment in View of Recently Available but Relatively Early Sources on Tibetan Medical Eclecticism'; Anya King, 'Tibetan Musk and Medieval Arab Perfumery'; Christopher I.
On the same subject, al-Sharq newspaper, another independent daily, published an editorial entitled 'Arab Barmakids' by Editor-in-Chief Abdul Rasoul.
The capital was shift ed from Damascus to the newly built city of Baghdad and the administration was placed in the hands of a loyal and competent family, the Barmakids of Persia.
It seems to have been at Rayy that the young Harun came into contact with a family who were to be immensely influential in his life, the Barmakids. The Barmakids hailed from the far east of the Islamic world, from the ancient city of Balkh in what is now northern Afghanistan.
Baghdad was a party town, and some of the most sumptuous entertainments were laid on by the Barmakids, a family whose name became synonymous with openhanded generosity.
Abu Nuwas' initial appearance at the `Abbasid court in Baghdad met with little success; his alliance with the Barmakids, the `Abbasid viziers, forced him to seek refuge in Egypt when the Barmakid dynasty collapsed.
van Bladel, "The Bactrian Background of the Barmakids," in Islam and Tibet: Interactions along the Musk Routes, ed.