Barn Swallow


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Barn Swallow

 

(Hirundo rustica), a bird of the order Pas-seriformes. The upper part of the body and a stripe on the breast are black with a blue sheen, the head and throat are reddish chestnut, and the abdomen is white or rust colored. The body measures 18-23 cm long. The tail feathers are in the form of thin, narrow sickles. The barn swallow is distributed in Europe, North Africa, Asia, and North America. In the USSR it is found everywhere south of the forest tundra. A migratory bird, it nests in structures near human habitation. The nest is cup-shaped and made of clumps of dirt mixed with saliva; it is fastened beneath eaves. There are two clutches per summer. The barn swallow is beneficial by destroying flies and other flying insects.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 6. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A.Gladkov. Moscow, 1954.
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However, this effect might be diminished under bridges where there are numerous visual barriers and where barn swallow nests can be spaced further apart and away from cave swallow nests.
Almost exclusively insectivores, barn swallows are dynamic aerial feeders.
Across their annual cycle, Barn Swallow occur throughout most of the longitudinal extent of the terrestrial Western Hemisphere with broad and complex movements during autumn migration (figure 3, top and center), which occur over several months.
In Europe and Asia, Barn Swallow clutches are smaller at low latitudes and larger at high latitudes (Moller 1994).
By focusing on the barn swallows, toads, tarantulas, and thistles, Lamberton found a way to connect with his girls and indulge his lost love of teaching.
Also, the fact that certain avian species, such as Eurasian Blackbirds, Great Gray Owls, and Barn Swallows in Austria, are especially vulnerable to USUV infection, is reminiscent of the observation that WNV in North America has primarily affected American Crows and Blue Jays (19,20).
Scientists found female barn swallows will not hesitate to cheat on their partners if they spy a more handsome suitor.
Furthermore, the reproductive behavior and ecology of the barn swallow differs from that of the cliff swallow (Samuel 1971; Ramstack et al.
borealis) bats (de la Cueva Salcedo, 1995) and barn swallows (Hirundo rustica; Blake et al.
Each barn swallow was marked with a metal ring on one leg, a plastic color ring on the other, and a unique combination of ink color markings on breast and belly feathers.
His photo of a barn swallow mother feeding her fledglings, titled "Anticipation," won the grand prize in the 2008 UO Outdoor Program Photo Contest.
The researchers studied the barn swallow, Hirundo rustica erythrogaster, which scientists regard as socially monogamous.