Barnaby Rudge

Barnaby Rudge

Dennis, the public hangman, is sentenced to be hanged on his own scaffold. [Br. Lit.: Dickens Barnaby Rudge]
See: Irony
References in classic literature ?
[7] If the invasion of the legitimate sphere of prose in England by the spirit of poetry, weaker or stronger, has been something far deeper than is indicated by that tendency to write unconscious blank verse, which has made it feasible to transcribe about one-half of Dickens's otherwise so admirable Barnaby Rudge in blank-verse lines, a tendency (outdoing our old friend M.
I liked 'David Copperfield,' and 'Barnaby Rudge,' and
They wrote plays such as Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet, A Tale of Two Cities, Barnaby Rudge and David Copperfield.
"He was practically a rock star after The Pickwick Papers and Oliver Twist [but] then Barnaby Rudge, American Notes and Martin Chuzzlewit didn't go down as well and he was up against it at the difficult seventh-album phase or whatever.
The single eBook will be in Kindle format and includes the following 15 novels: The Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, The Old Curiosity Shop, Barnaby Rudge, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and Son, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Hard Times, Little Dorit, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, Our Mutual Friend and The Mystery of Edwin Drood.
3 What kind of animal was Grip, Barnaby Rudge's pet?
Three of the book's chapters are devoted to novels of John Wycliffe and Lollardy (1328-1384), Barnaby Rudge and the Gordon Riots (1780), and works related to Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498).
"When I first had the vision of the Dickensian style shop called 'Barnaby Rudge' or just plain 'Barnabys,' it was during the 1970s, which was a very different time in optics.
Barnaby Rudge thus combines Whig arguments that Tories provoke popular discontent with Chartist calls for an alliance with the bourgeoisie.
B.'s study touches on two novels by Walter Scott, Dickens's Barnaby Rudge, and George Eliot's Romola, but focuses primarily on close reading of the religious controversies woven through the pages of noncanonical popular novels by proselytizers and their theologies of history.
physical force, with examples from the novels Wat Tyler, Guy Fawkes, and Barnaby Rudge; the Chartist Land Plan from 1842 to 1848 and the novels Coningsby, Sybil, Hillingdon Hall, and Sunshine and Shadow; and the era following the rejection of the third Chartist petition in 1848 and the collapse of the Land Plan, when emphasis was shifted to cooperative associations and trade unionism, with discussion of Yeast, Alton Locke, Mary Barton, and North and South.
In David Copperfield and Barnaby Rudge, the characters confront "gloomy Christians with an eternal frown" (7).