barn

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barn,

abbr. b, in physics, unit of nuclear cross section, i.e., the effective target presented by a nucleusnucleus,
in physics, the extremely dense central core of an atom. The Nature of the Nucleus
Composition

Atomic nuclei are composed of two types of particles, protons and neutrons, which are collectively known as nucleons.
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 for collisions leading to nuclear reactions; it is equal to 10−24 square centimeters. The barn is approximately the size of the geometric cross section of an atomic nucleus; the term was coined because an effective cross section that large would present a target "as big as a barn," i.e., an easy target for nuclear bombardment. In practice, effective cross sections of nuclei for many reactions are measured in millibarns (10−3 barn) because, for most interactions, only a small fraction of collisions cause reactions.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Barn

A building for housing animals and storing farm equipment, hay, and other agricultural produce.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Barn

 

a unit of effective cross-sectional area of nuclear processes. One barn = 10–24 cm2 = 10–28 m2. Selection of this unit is related to the fact that the geometric cross sections of atomic nuclei are on the order of 10–24 cm2 in size. The magnitudes of the majority of cross sections of nuclear reactions usually lie in the range between 10–22 cm2 and 10–27cm2. For this reason fractional and multiple barn units are used, such as millibarn (10–27 cm2), microbarn (10–30 cm2), and megabarn (10–18 cm2).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

barn

[′bärn]
(agriculture)
A farm building used for storage of agricultural products and equipment or for housing farm animals.
(nuclear physics)
A unit of area equal to 10-24 square centimeter; used in specifying nuclear cross sections. Symbolized b.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

barn

A farm building, most often rectangular (but occasionally circular or polygonal), for housing farm animals, storing farm equipment, threshing grain, and storing grain, hay, and other agricultural produce. Barn construction usually depends on such factors as the local climate and traditions, building materials available, the skills and time required for construction, and the cost. For some examples, see bank barn, basement barn, circular barn, connected barn, Connecticut barn, crib barn, double barn, Dutch barn, English barn, forebay barn, four-crib barn, German barn, hex barn, New England connected barn, octagon barn, Pennsylvania barn, Pennsylvania Dutch barn, potato barn, raised barn, round barn, side-hill barn, Sweitzer barn, Swiss barn, three-bay barn, tobacco barn, Yankee barn.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

barn

1
US and Canadian a large shed for sheltering railroad cars, trucks, etc.

barn

2
a unit of nuclear cross section equal to 10--28 square metre.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
than was our heroe at what he saw in this barn. While he was looking everywhere round him with astonishment, a venerable person approached him with many friendly salutations, rather of too hearty a kind to be called courtly.
While his majesty was thus discoursing with Jones, a sudden uproar arose in the barn, and as it seems upon this occasion:--the courtesy of these people had by degrees removed all the apprehensions of Partridge, and he was prevailed upon not only to stuff himself with their food, but to taste some of their liquors, which by degrees entirely expelled all fear from his composition, and in its stead introduced much more agreeable sensations.
When it rained he would find a deserted building, if he could, and if not, he would wait until after dark and then, with his stick ready, begin a stealthy approach upon a barn. Generally he could get in before the dog got scent of him, and then he would hide in the hay and be safe until morning; if not, and the dog attacked him, he would rise up and make a retreat in battle order.
Twice he even managed to capture a chicken, and had a feast, once in a deserted barn and the other time in a lonely spot alongside of a stream.
Without urgent help, barns owls could be lost forever according to The Ulster Wildlife Trust.
Five of the existing buildings on the site are barns, with the first two being older sandstone buildings and redundant to agricultural use.
The Barn Believers Community Project Fund, a part of the Battle Creek Community Foundation, provides grants to nonprofit organizations for activities focused on preserving traditional and historical barns, such as protecting documents and photo collections, conducting structural assessments, and undertaking outreach and education programs.
In a major crackdown, the Sharjah Municipality razed illegal animal barns as well as abandoned unauthorised structures in the remote areas of the city.
Buffalo barns have been set up once again in KU's staff colony.
20, Garfield Farm Museum in Campton Hills will offer the "Barns 101" and "Barns 201" lectures at 10 a.m.
The suggestion may not seem very promising, because in the standard example considered so far--that is, the target true belief that there is a barn ahead--only one ability seems relevant for determining achievement--namely, the ability visually to distinguish barns from non-barns.