Barr body

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Barr body

[′bär ‚bäd·ē]
(cell and molecular biology)
A condensed, inactivated X chromosome inside the nuclear membrane in interphase somatic cells of women and most female mammals. Also known as sex chromatin.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Slides were prepared and stained with Giemsa staining and studied oil immersion micro scope for the presence of Barr bodies. When scoring Barr bodies in cells of the buccal mucosa, only peripherally located Barr bodies should be considered.
The sex chromatin (or buccal smear) test, which requires the identification of Barr bodies during microscopic examination of cells scraped from the inner lining of the athlete's cheek, was developed and first introduced during the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games.
Illogical or ambiguous statements were frequent - (such as 'Barr bodies can be used to determine sex (present in females but not in males))', 'pass their X chromosome to half their son' and 'these colonies are then cross with another yeast strain'."
Blood and tissue components include sex chromosomes, Barr bodies (or sex chromatin) and the Sty gene (sex-determining region of the Y-chromosome; Davidson and Smith, 1954; Davidson, 1960, 1966; Eberle, 1967; Foster et al., 1992).