barrier

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barrier

1. 
a. an exposed offshore sand bar separated from the shore by a lagoon
b. (as modifier): a barrier beach
2. that part of the Antarctic icecap extending over the sea

Barrier

 

(in Russian, zaval), an antitank, antitransport, or anti-infantry obstacle. Barriers are made of lumber, stones, or snow on probable enemy routes of travel in places where it is difficult to bypass them. When setting up a timber barrier, trees of more than 20 cm in diameter are used. They are sawed down at a height of 60–120 cm and piled criss-cross with the crowns facing the enemy. In order to make it difficult to pull the barrier apart, the trees are not completely separated from their stumps; they are secured to them, woven with barbed wire, and also reinforced by the placement of land mines and high-explosive charges. During the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45 timber barriers were used extensively by Soviet troops on the defense in forested regions. Stone barriers are set up in mountains or in populated areas by demolishing cliffs or urban stone structures. Barriers made of snow can be devised in mountain and northern regions. In mining the Russian word zaval signifies the accidental destruction of a large rock mass in a mining excavation that disrupts its normal use.


Barrier

 

a lifting or sliding beam, usually installed at a railroad crossing to stop automobile, cart, and pedestrian traffic prior to the passing of a train. Barriers may be operated manually, mechanically, or automatically. Automatic barriers are operated by signals from the railroad’s automation and remote control systems; signal lights and acoustic devices may be used. The normal position for automatic barriers is the open position; for nonauto-matic barriers it is the closed position.

What does it mean when you dream about a barrier?

A barrier may signify that the dreamer is experiencing some obstacle in an arena of his or her life.

barrier

[′bar·ē·ər]
(ecology)
Any physical or biological factor that restricts the migration or free movement of individuals or populations.
(navigation)
Anything which obstructs or prevents passage of a craft.
(physics)

Barrier

[′bar·ē·ər]
(ordnance)
A passive acoustic detection system for submarines, consisting of hydrophones positioned on the ocean floor and connected by undersea cable to a land-based computer center.

barrier

1. Same as barricade.
2. According to the Architectural Barriers Act, any obstacle to the accessibility of a building by disabled people.

barrier

barrierclick for a larger image
i. As it relates to the sound barrier, it is a barrier to flight encountered by an airplane designed for subsonic speeds when it reaches transonic speeds and meets the turbulence incident of diverse degrees of compressibility. Intense buffet and loss of controls to a varying degree may be experienced at this speed.
ii. A net forming part of an arrester, or crash barrier system meant to arrest forward motion of an aircraft that is likely to overshoot the runway. Normally, the net lies horizontally on the ground and is raised when required. The vertical ropes of the barrier net are made of nylon, which are attached to the steel ropes at the top and the bottom of the barrier net.
References in classic literature ?
The Nautilus had to manoeuvre very carefully so as not to strike against this submarine barrier.
Very near, only half a league from the Barriers, -- it is at Auteuil.
So it happens with fortune, who shows her power where valour has not prepared to resist her, and thither she turns her forces where she knows that barriers and defences have not been raised to constrain her.
No sooner will it have passed the city barriers than it will break down, purposely break down.
THE VIEW from the snowy peak of the Wind River Mountains, while it had excited Captain Bonneville's enthusiasm, had satisfied him that it would be useless to force a passage westward, through multiplying barriers of cliffs and precipices.
I am afraid in England we have too many artificial social barriers.
In this country, it must be confessed, fortune-hunting has made giant strides, within the last few years, and that, too, with an audacity of pretension that is unrestrained by any of the social barriers which exist elsewhere.
Say what you will about the identity of the reasoning process in all branches of thought, or about the advantage of coming to subjects with a fresh mind, the adjustment of butter to flour, and of heat to pastry, is NOT the best preparation for the office of prime minister; besides, in the present imperfectly- organized state of society, there are social barriers.
Hemmed in by these stupendous barriers, the valley would be altogether shut out from the rest of the world, were it not that it is accessible from the sea at one end, and by a narrow defile at the other.
With that thought I rolled my eves nervously around on the barriers of iron that hemmed me in.
How her heart swelled with joy and gratitude as she passed the barriers of Portsmouth, and how Susan's face wore its broadest smiles, may be easily conceived.
In vain did he try, in order to fix upon himself one of those looks, which were thrown carelessly around, or bestowed elsewhere, to produce in the animal he rode its greatest display of strength, speed, temper and address; in vain did he, by exciting his horse almost to madness, spur him, at the risk of dashing himself in pieces against the trees, or of rolling in the ditches, over the gates and barriers which they passed, or down the steep declivities of the hills.