Bartimaeus


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Bartimaeus

(bärtīmē`əs), in the New Testament, blind man to whom Jesus restored sight.
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In her article "Fantastic Books," Rebecca-Anne Do Rozario analyses this "material rather [than] allusive intertextuality--the book, ink, and paper" (2008, 209) that we often find in late twentieth- and twenty-first-century children's books, such as Cornelia Funke's Inkheart trilogy ([2003] 2004, 2005, [2008] 2009), Marcus Sedgwick's The Book of Dead Days ([2003] 2011) and its sequel The Dark Flight Down ([2005] 2010) or Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus trilogy ([2003] 2010a, [2004] 2010b, [2005] 2010c).
At times I was reminded of fantasy writer Jonathan Stroud's inimitable djinn Bartimaeus, whose narrative and digressions resonate with the same panache as those of Abdullah.
Jesus drew aside from a large gathering to meet blind Bartimaeus. As a minister, I constantly remind myself to spend most of my time being there for the individual who asks me to be there.
As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd, Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus, sat by the roadside begging.
It is probably what Bartimaeus felt when he learned that Christ, the popular rabbi well-known for his healing miracles, was coming his way.
Bartimaeus did not have sight in both of his eyes, but this did not prevent him from seeing the answer to three of life's most important questions.
The cure of the blind beggar named Bartimaeus just outside Jericho is particularly significant for the evangelist Mark.
A bit like Bartimaeus, the blind beggar of today's Gospel who desired only to be able to see, Letitia believes God will give her the help she needs in spite of the odds.
Of the many healed by Jesus, three attempt to join his community: the Gerasene demoniac, whom Jesus declines to take along (Mark 5:18); once-blind Bartimaeus, who falls in behind Jesus on the way to Jerusalem (Mark 10:52); and Mary Magdalene, healed of seven demons, who remains with Jesus to the cross and beyond.
His testimony of a total deliverance from drugs issues and health complications by Christ inspired me to write the song using the Biblical story of the Blind Bartimaeus.
From Tobit to Bartimaeus, From Qumran to Siloam: The Social Role of Blind People and Attitudes toward the Blind in New Testament Times.
The Encounter of Two Sons, the "Son of Timaeus" and the "Son of David": Exegetical Approach of the Healing of Bartimaeus (Mk 10:46-52)