Bartleby

Bartleby

refuses to associate with others or even to mingle with other employees. [Am. Lit.: Melville Bartleby the Scrivener]

Bartleby

copyist in Wall Street office; refuses to do anything but copy documents. [Am. Lit.: “Bartleby the Scrivener”]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a lesson to be learned here from Bartleby, who stands before the law (not fully inside or outside its domain).
And then there is Melville's immortal "Bartleby the Scrivener," about a New York lawyer whose clerk "would prefer not" to do anything and sits like a lump in the office.
The essays that most nearly address the pecuniary characteristics of the modern age as defined in the collection are the two essays about "Bartleby, the Scrivener." In the first, "'Bartleby, the Scrivener': The Politics of Biography and the Future of Capitalism," by Ikuno Saiki, the author mentions the relevance of John Jacob Astor's life as a framework for the story, as well as Melville's recognition of the "degenerative aspects of capitalism in the life and death of John Jacob Astor" (86).
The essay, in the process of making its meta-critical point, reviews the collection Co-memorative essays on Herman Melville's 'Bartleby the scriverner" edited by Janusz Semrau (2009).
Yet in his translation of Herman Melville's "Bartleby" (1853, translated 1943), be did precisely this.
New York, NY, May 18, 2010 --(PR.com)-- WebSiteFaves.com a user-based guide to the Internet, today named http://www.GROWW.org its most-useful Site-of-the-Week, joining a distinguished list of previous winners including CEO Express, Bartleby, Newseum and Exploratorium.
"When Bartleby says, 'I would prefer not to' to every request made of him in the workplace, it may seem as if he is simply offering refusal and obstruction.
As such, the evental 'everything has changed', far from leaving the historical ground unaffected, shakes it and splatters it from all directions: from whence comes the trouble that afflicts contemporaries when Bartleby blinks like the Medicine-Man, whose christ-like figure installed itself at the heart of being qua being ; from whence comes the perplexity which grips us in knowing that his infirmity, his exterior and interior desertion, his apparent political withdrawal, his absence of will, his vital anorexia, are only the epiphenomena of a great solar health ...
Like Bartleby the scrivener, I would have preferred not to do this."