Bartsia


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bartsia

 

(or Odontites), a genus of annual grasses of the family Scrophulariaceae. The stem of a bartsia plant is usually ramose with opposite leaves. The flowers are clustered in one-sided spicate heads. The crowns are bilabiate and are pink, reddish, or yellow. The fruit is a capsule. Bartsias are semiparasite plants. Seasonal dimorphism has been noted in some species. There are about 30 species in the extratropical regions of the northern hemisphere, primarily in the Mediterranean. In the USSR there are five species. Red bartsia (Odontites serotina) is the most common species, growing as a weed in fields, fallow lands along roadsides, and, less frequently, in meadows.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Palmer and his colleagues found that several Plantago species carry versions of a gene called atp1 that looks more like the comparable gene in either Bartsia or Cuscuta than like the one found in other Plantago species.
Runner-up to highly-rated Dibiya at Galway, Weld's charge was caught late by Red Bartsia at Tralee last time, when he finished twelve lengths clear of the remainder.
Floral scents of Bartsia alpina (Scrophulariaceae): chemical composition and variation between individual plants.
Gender variation in Bartsia alpina (Scrophulariaceae), a subarctic perennial hermaphrodite.
Genera Species Senecio 28 Calamagrostis 21 Nototriche 19 Poa 19 Gentianella 13 Valeriana 13 Werneria 10 Lupinus 9 Astragalus 9 Plantago 8 Festuca 8 Ranunculus 7 Mniodes 7 Pycnophyllum 6 Bartsia 6 Perezia 6 Geranium 6 Oxalis 6 Lachemilla 6 Xenophyllum 6 Cerastium 5 Hypochaeris 5 Sisyrinchium 5 Viola 5 Table 4.
BOTANICAL whizz Gary McLardy visited Cabin Hill nature reserve and found blooming wintergreen, tufted vetch, yellow and red bartsia, common mullein (still a scarce plant at this site), wild carrot and many purple loosestrifes.
[33, 107, 150, 171, 178, 232, 233] Orobanchaceae Bartsia alpina L.
The reserves are home to rare species, including the Yellow Bartsia plant and some previously unrecorded bugs and beetles.