baseload

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Related to Base load: Peak load

baseload

[′bās‚lōd]
(electricity)
Minimum load of a power generator over a given period of time.
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If we are going to have affordable, reliable energy that powers our economy and advances our quality of life, we must maintain an adequate supply of base load electricity that is always available when it is needed.
If the machine is too large, then the base load rises as a proportion of the total load.
In the example above, with a base load above 100kW, the boiler will modulate without turning off and 'short cycling' can occur.
The Kingdom would need a base load of 40 GW to meet its energy needs, but so far no plan has been set on what energy mix would be used, said Suleiman.
This is nonsense given that the base load electricity demand on the grid system is never less than 25 gigawatts (25,000 megawatts) even in the middle of the night in the summer, and tidal machines cannot possibly meet this demand let alone - on account of their intermittency - the "spinning reserve" provided by the base load generators about which he sneers.
For a typical plant, the base load should lie in the range of 10% to 40% of the average total load.
This is the second training facility this year to select DFC power plants to meet its base load electricity needs and to increase energy security," said FuelCell Energy president and chief operating officer R.
Check the base load for older hydraulic machines by monitoring the energy used with the main motor running but with the platens not moving--and be prepared for a big surprise.
Two main categories of power stations can be identified: base load stations which supply electricity around the clock and peak load stations which can react swiftly to sudden increases or decreases in demand.
Energy usage at a plastics processing plant consists of a base load and a process load.
The reduction in the consolidated risk profile stemming from the addition of the LSP assets is partially offset by increased commodity risk exposure from the company's Illinois base load plants as a fixed price contract for those assets expired at year-end 2006.
This is where base load power stations come in handy.
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