base pair

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Related to Base pairs: DNA, DNA replication

base pair

[′bās ‚per]
(cell and molecular biology)
Two nitrogenous bases, one purine and one pyrimidine, that pair in double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
With new base pairs, the cells could make new codons, and those new genetic words held the blueprints for compounds that were previously impossible for cells to make.
In order to create this bacterium, the researchers used a tool called a nucleotide transporter, which allowed the organism to hold on to the unnatural base pair, and made it easier for it to be copied across the cell membrane.
Papua New Guineans inherited a very large duplication of about 225,000 base pairs from Denisovans, an extinct group of hominids related to Neandertals.
Other sets of base pairs were added or altered to enable researchers to tag DNA as synthetic or native, and to delete or move genes on synIII.
To get a sense of the energy and temperature ranges here, a DNA sequence of about equal numbers of A:T and G:C base pairs, about 13 base pairs in total length, has a Tm of around 37[degrees]C, while a similar random sequence of about 20 bases has a Tm of about 51[degrees]C Making sequences longer or more G:C rich raises the Tm.
23-26) However, another key point of Kool's discovery was that non-hydrogen-bonded hydrophobic base analogs could be potential candidates for creating unnatural third base pairs.
The study was performed with conventional library preparation and more than 90% of the base pairs generated were from 454 Sequencing," continued Dr.
DNA is made up from atoms that join together to make bases, phosphates and sugars, which then combine to make base pairs.
Due to technical limitations, they were able to cover only 97% of the whole sequence and left 11 gaps, none of which exceeded 150,000 base pairs in size, according to the Nature article.
The only difference between people, or any animal, is the order of the base pairs.
European researchers have sequenced 12 million base pairs that contain the entire 6,000 gene pattern of baker's yeast.
Even with that improvement, gel sequencing still proceeds at a snail's pace - it can read only a few thousand DNA base pairs per day.