base pair

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Related to Base pairs: DNA, DNA replication

base pair

[′bās ‚per]
(cell and molecular biology)
Two nitrogenous bases, one purine and one pyrimidine, that pair in double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
"In other words, Cas12a does a better job of checking each base pair before moving on to the next one.
(3) Seed region with 7 base pairs and starting from positions 1-4, may have one G=U base-pair or one bulge (either of the miRNA or of the 3'UTR) or single non-G=U mismatch in between seed region.
While the entire genomic sequence of the CFTR locus is more than 250,000 base pairs including exons and introns, the coding area (exons only) is much shorter, about 4,500 base pairs, and while some 90 percent of cystic fibrosis cases can be attributed to a single three-base pair deletion, more than one thousand mutations in the gene are known from studies.
In order to create this bacterium, the researchers used a tool called a nucleotide transporter, which allowed the organism to hold on to the unnatural base pair, and made it easier for it to be copied across the cell membrane.
Firstly, allicin molecule was put at three positions around G-C, A-T, and the bridge of the base pairs as shown in Figure 2.
Included is a molecular weight marker sizing the fragments between 200 and 300 base pairs. The online program Lalign allowed for comparison of a reference sequence of CALR with the sequencing product.
Papua New Guineans inherited a very large duplication of about 225,000 base pairs from Denisovans, an extinct group of hominids related to Neandertals.
The stability of a secondary structure is quantified as the amount of free energy released or used by forming base pairs. The more negative the free energy of a structure the more likely is formation of that structure because more stored energy is released.
30,000 base pairs. State your offered system s maximum read length capabilities.
The aim of this study was to assess the stability of each of the four base pairs (Oz:G, Oz:A, Oz:C, and Oz:T) during DNA replication.
(12) They also designed other unnatural base pairs with different hydrogen bonding geometries, such as X-[kappa] (Fig.