Bashville

Bashville

footman; has noble, unrequited affection for heiress. [Br. Lit.: Cashel Byron’s Profession]
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A long forgotten label for unique retribution, ultion was last mentioned in George Bernard Shaw's 1901 play, The Admirable Bashville. During the play's third act, an earnest police officer arrives at the heroine's door to investigate an illegal boxing match that took place near the local fair.
By the time Shaw composed The Admirable Bashville at the turn of the century, "ultion" was an antiquated synonym for "revenge." The term fell out of favor (Shaw's is its last published citation according to the Oxford English Dictionary) and no longer bore an association with the more familiar talionic payback.
As the scene from The Admirable Bashville suggests, ultionic vengeance fuses the need for restitution and social obligation.
Thus, he frames his vengeful quest in the same contradictory terms as that righteous police officer from The Admirable Bashville: "I want the infamous Fire Chief of the Volunteers," Walker tells a local press, "turned over to my justice" (211-12, emphasis mine).
Admirable Bashville, adapt and dir: David Staller from Shaw.
Billy Elmore created a winning culture at Bashville; why shouldn't he be able to build one in Arkadelphia?
WARWICK: 5.50 Colombe d'Or (M Chapman to Mrs S Leech); Bashville Star (Miss C Herrington to R Mathew).