British thermal unit

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British thermal unit,

abbr. Btu, unit for measuring heat quantity in the customary system of English units of measurementEnglish units of measurement,
principal system of weights and measures used in a few nations, the only major industrial one being the United States. It actually consists of two related systems—the U.S.
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, equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water at its maximum density [which occurs at a temperature of 39.1 degrees Fahrenheit (°F;) ] by 1°F;. The Btu may also be defined for the temperature difference between 59°F; and 60°F;. One Btu is approximately equivalent to the following: 251.9 calories; 778.26 foot-pounds; 1055 joules; 107.5 kilogram-meters; 0.0002928 kilowatt-hours. A pound (0.454 kilogram) of good coal when burned should yield 14,000 to 15,000 Btu; a pound of gasoline or other fuel oil, approximately 19,000 Btu.
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British thermal unit

(BTU)
The amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 degree Fahrenheit in temperature—about the heat content of one wooden kitchen match.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

British thermal unit

[′brid·ish ′thər·məl ‚yü·nət]
(thermodynamics)
Abbreviated Btu.
A unit of heat energy equal to the heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 pound of air-free water from 60° to 61°F at a constant pressure of 1 standard atmosphere; it is found experimentally to be equal to 1054.5 joules. Also known as sixty degrees Fahrenheit British thermal unit (Btu60/61).
A unit of heat energy that is equal to 1/180 of the heat needed to raise 1 pound of air-free water from 32°F (0°C) to 212°F (100°C) at a constant pressure of 1 standard atmosphere; it is found experimentally to be equal to 1055.79 joules. Also known as mean British thermal unit (Btumean).
A unit of heat energy whose magnitude is such that 1 British thermal unit per pound equals 2326 joules per kilogram; it is equal to exactly 1055.05585262 joules. Also known as international table British thermal unit (BtuIT).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

British thermal unit

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. Abbr. Btu.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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