Bassianus


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Bassianus

murdered after being falsely accused. [Br. Lit.: Titus Andronicus]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In response to Saturninus' promises "to advance" the "name and honourable family" of Andronicus by marrying Lavinia, Bassianus boldly proclaims "this maid is mine" (Shakespeare 1997b, 1.1.238-39, 1.1.276).
Lucius Septimius Bassianus, known as Caracalla, was a black Roman emperor who ruled from 211 to 217.
Chiron and Demetrius are her other two charming sons, and they are persuaded by Aaron to kill Bassianus, the fiance of Titus' daughter, Lavinia, before raping her and cutting out her tongue.
Lavinia then is whisked off stage by Bassianus who claims to have a prior espousal.
When Lavinia's husband, Bassianus, is killed by Tamora's sons, Chiron and Demetrius, Lavinia, fearing her imminent torture, begs Tamora to intervene as a woman and a mother.
Instead of marrying the man of her father's choice, Lavinia, ignoring her daughterly obligations, elopes with Bassianus, with whom she is in love.
In Emesa (today Homs, Syria), they arranged the elevation of Maesa's grandson, a fourteen-year-old named Varius Avitus Bassianus, reportedly Caracalla's illegitimate son.
Balticus 1971; Harriman and Redmond 1976 Juncus bassianus unknown L.A.S.Johnson Juncus beringensis Buchenau 126 Nakata et al.
predecessors Johannes Bassianus (late twelfth century) and Azo Porcius
In giving his daughter, Lavinia, to Saturninus in marriage despite her passionate bond with Bassianus, Vickery's Titus self-righteously gave the living female symbol of his masculine honor literally into the hands of the fickle, selfish Saturninus.
The moment that interests me occurs during the hunt scene, when Quintus and Martius find themselves in the perverse posture of being buried alive alongside the deceased Bassianus. Notably, they assign the earth a kind of agency for his death, describing the "subtle hole" (2.3.198) in which they fall as a "detested, dark, blood-drinking pit" (2.3.224).