Bast

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Bast

(băst), ancient Egyptian cat goddess. At first a goddess of the home, she later became known as a goddess of war. The center of her cult was at Bubastis. Her name also appears as Ubast.

bast:

see barkbark,
outer covering of the stem of woody plants, composed of waterproof cork cells protecting a layer of food-conducting tissue—the phloem or inner bark (also called bast).
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Bast

 

plants grown for their bast fiber leaf-bearing trees, primarily lindens. Bast is used to weave baskets and other articles; it was formerly used to make lapti (bast sandals).


Bast

 

fibers of linden bark that have been separated from the other tissues by soaking the bark in water for an extended period. They are used to make matting, large bags, brushes (for whitewashing), and bindings for plants, as well as mops.

bast

[bast]
(botany)

Bast

cat-headed goddess of love and fashion. [Egyptian Myth.: Espy, 20]
See: Love

Bast

cat-headed goddess representing sun and moon. [Ancient Egyptian Rel.: Parrinder, 42]
See: Moon

Bast

cat-headed goddess representing sun and moon. [Egypt. Myth.: Parrinder, 41]
See: Sun
References in periodicals archive ?
Near Bastet is an elaborately coloured box that symbolizes early Chinese contributions to chemistry and medicine.
By the Graeco-Roman period, cats as the personification of the goddess Bastet, were deemed to be sacred animals and it was forbidden to remove them from Egypt.
A cachette of 600 Ptolemaic statues were also unearthed during the routine excavations, including a large collection of icons depicting Bastet, goddess of protection and motherhood, along with bronze and ceramic statues of Egyptian deities such as Harpocrates and Ptah.
Freyja, the goddess of love, like Bastet, was drawn in a cart by two cats.
In her paintings Webber re-envisioned Ishtar the ancient Mesopotamian goddess of love and fertility; Bastet the Egyptian goddess of vengeance and the daughter of Ra; Isis the Egyptian goddess of fertility and the wife of Osiris; Artemis the Greek virgin goddess of the hunt and the moon and Mary Magdalene.
Although that suggestive gesture itself once had a sacred significance in the context of the fertility rites performed in honour of the goddess Bastet or Isis Bubastis.
Cult evokes prehistoric standing stone circles as well as hieratic Egyptian cat sculpture-in ancient Egypt, the cat goddess Bastet was the patroness of family happiness.
6) For further investigation of the regimes of thought and writing in the Cahiers, see in particular Ned Bastet 'Towards a Biography of the Mind', pp.
Bastet G, Bruand A, Voltz A, Bornand M, Quetin P (1997) Performance of available pedotransfer functions for prediction the water retention properties of French soils.
For example, in Cairo, Egypt, "A" was for ankh (the symbol of eternal life), "B" was for Bastet (Ancient Egyptian cat goddess), and "C' was for cartouche (an oval figure with a name in hieroglyphics).
The cat in Ancient Egypt was important both as a domestic pet and as a symbol of the goddess Bastet and Ra.
Ned Bastet provides an exemplary 'biography of the mind' balanced effectively with Paul Gifford's study of Valery's 'thinking-writing games'.