guano

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guano

(gwä`nō), dried excrement of sea birds and bats found principally on the coastal islands of Peru, Africa, Chile, and the West Indies. It contains about 6% phosphorus, 9% nitrogen, 2% potassium, and moisture. Guano is found mixed with feathers and bones and is used as a fertilizer.

Guano

 

the decomposed (in dry climate) droppings of gulls and other sea fowl.

Guano is used as a valuable nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer; it contains about 9 percent nitrogen and 13 percent phosphoric acid, potassium, and calcium. Accumulations of guano are found on islands off the coasts of Chile, Peru, and South Africa as well as on the islands of the Caribbean. Guano is also the name given to the artificially prepared (mainly in Japan and Norway) mineral fertilizers from the waste products of the fishing and seal-hunting industries.

guano

[′gwän·ō]
(materials)
Phosphate- and nitrogen-rich, partially decomposed excrement of seabirds; used as a fertilizer.

guano

1. 
a. the dried excrement of fish-eating sea birds, deposited in rocky coastal regions of South America: contains the urates, oxalates, and phosphates of ammonium and calcium; used as a fertilizer
b. the accumulated droppings of bats and seals
2. any similar but artificial substance used as a fertilizer
References in periodicals archive ?
He did not report any exposures to bird droppings, bat guano, caves, or potting soils.
Fletcher (1982), in a study of the microbial ecology of a community living on gray bat guano in a Missouri cave, noted the presence of 30 species of mites.
"There was bat guano dripping from the inside of the cabins."
I add as much manure as much as possible - cow, chicken and bat guano. And that's my secret, I guess," he said.
Bat Guano is one of the oldest fertilizers known to humans.
Bat guano is an important food source in caves and is eaten by microscopic invertebrates, cave insects, cave crayfish, and cave fish.
At the landfill, workers moved topsoil from an area that previously housed a barn; at the bridge, workers observed bat guano on bridge beams.
Well, it means that bat guano (even called waste) damage in a homeowner's attic cannot be denied insurance recovery under the homeowner pollution exclusion, in which pollutants specifically are defined to include "any ...
Exports of bat guano accounted for three quarters of the revenue of what South American country in the 1860s?
The nearby Windsor Caves, now owned by the World Wildlife Federation, are the domain of a bat found exclusively in this area, and the Windsor Great House now serves as a boardinghouse for scholarly enthusiasts of bat guano.
In fact, little work has been conducted to date on bat guano communities in buildings (Palmer & Gunier 1975); the only two studies reported are from New Hampshire (Bernath & Kunz 1981) and Indiana (Whitaker et al.