Bat-Mite


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Bat-Mite

(pop culture)
More a bother than a bad guy, the impish Bat- Mite was devised as Batman's answer to Mr. Mxyzptlk. The pint-sized pest first popped into the Caped Crusader's life in 1959 in Detective Comics #267's “Batman Meets Bat-Mite” by writer Bill Finger and artist Sheldon Moldoff. “An elf dressed in a crazy-looking Batman costume!” utters Robin the Boy Wonder as this kooky kewpie, standing not-so-tall at just under 3 feet, materializes inside the secret Batcave. A super-hero wannabe from another dimension, Bat-Mite's goal is to make the Dynamic Duo a Terrific Trio. He uses his magical powers to fabricate absurdities— from causing a bridge to ripple to animating a giant Batman statue—merely to witness his heroic idol in action. After several scoldings from Batman, Bat-Mite takes a hint and returns home … albeit temporarily, phasing out with a cryptic “Good-bye—for now!” Nine months later he was back in “The Return of Bat-Mite,” in the pages of Detective #276 (1960), and returned regularly to bug Batman, Robin, and even Batwoman and the original Bat-Girl. DC Comics first paired him with Mr. Mxyzptlk in World's Finest Comics #113 (1960), their union posing a headache for Superman and Batman. On several occasions throughout the 1960s, some of the strangest scenarios encountered by Batman and Superman were mystically manufactured by the troublemaking Bat-Mite/Mr. Mxyzptlk team. By the late 1960s Bat-Mite was booted into limbo, although he soon found a welcome home on television in Filmation's animated series The New Adventures of Batman (1977–1978), reprising his early 1960s comics role as the well-meaning but pesky tag-along. His sole comic-book appearance during that decade occurred in the whimsical “Bat- Mite's New York Adventure” by Bob Rozakis and Michael Golden, appearing in Detective #482 (1979), in which the imp made an unappreciated visit to the DC Comics offices. While mostly a relic of the Silver Age (1956–1969), Bat-Mite still surfaces for a nostalgic romp for readers from time to time. His first appearance in DC's contemporary continuity took place in Alan Grant and Kevin O'Neill's “Legend of the Dark Mite” in Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #38 (1992), in which a hallucinating felon told Batman of his “encounter” with a Bat-dressed troll. Bat-Mite has also been seen in several other noncontinuity stories and as a plush doll, statuette, and action figure from DC Direct. If imitation is indeed the sincerest form of flattery, perhaps Bat-Mite's greatest legacy is his inspiration of Larry, a problematic pixie with a Robin fixation who occasionally appears on the animated series Teen Titans (2003–present).
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding to the adventure, players can link the Nintendo DS version to the Wii version of the game to unlock Bat-Mite as a playable character who can be controlled with the Nintendo DS.
The game provides maximum replay value to those who own both the Wii and Nintendo DS versions by allowing them to connect the two systems to unlock BAT-MITE as a playable character.