bathtub curve

(redirected from Bathtub effect)

bathtub curve

[′bath‚təb ‚kərv]
(industrial engineering)
An equipment failure-rate curve with an initial sharply declining failure rate, followed by a prolonged constant-average failure rate, after which the failure rate again increases sharply.

bathtub curve

Common term for the curve (resembling an end-to-end section of one of those claw-footed antique bathtubs) that describes the expected failure rate of electronics with time: initially high, dropping to near 0 for most of the system's lifetime, then rising again as it "tires out". See also burn-in period, infant mortality.
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The analyst notes that choppy Q1 weather should not be a surprise at this point, but Home Depot appears confident that the bathtub effect holds in 1H, with anticipated comp acceleration in the second half of the year.
In conventional needling lines web contractions in the needle loom lead to heavy edges in the batt known as "bathtub effect." This contraction is a consequence of needling a crosslapped batt with cross oriented fibres.