Batoche

Batoche

(bătŏsh`), historic site, central Sask., Canada, on the South Saskatchewan River. During Riel's Rebellion, Louis Riel made his headquarters there, and the rebels were routed on May 12, 1885.
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Today, Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, on behalf of Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), along with Batoche MLA Delbert Kirsch on behalf of Social Services Minister and Minister Responsible for Saskatchewan Housing Corporation (SHC) Paul Merriman, and Habitat for Humanity (Habitat) Prince Albert Executive Director Jan Thomas, officially celebrated the opening of the Habitat for Humanity home in Duck Lake.
Perhaps the most exciting naval experience of the rebellion was that of the Northcote which was ordered to take part in an attack on Batoche, the Metis stronghold.
5 kilometres from Riel's self-proclaimed capital of Batoche.
In the summer of 1885, Moose Jaw was home to 400 soldiers sent by the Federal Government to assist the NWMP in the North West Rebellion at Batoche.
Instead, Canada sent troops that eventually defeated the Metis in the 1885 Battle of Batoche.
After all, the opera named after Louis Riel openly enacts that dissonance (and all those differences listed above) in a plot that tells the story of two rebellions, the one in Red River in 1868/69 and the other in Saskatchewan in 1884/85 that ended with the defeat of Riel at Batoche.
Delbert Kirsch, depute provincial de Batoche, a ete nomme vice-president des comites.
Delbert Kirsch, MLA for Batoche, was appointed Deputy Chair of Committees.
29) Singling out a number of sites for having strayed from their original commemorative intent, Cameron then focused on Batoche in Saskatchewan where she criticized the emerging public history research and interpretation of Metis persistence in the face of hostile settler colonialism and the military defeat of 1885.
The ways in which whiteness permeates normative scripts of nationhood are the topic of Andrea Zerebeski's review of four books in the Dear Canada and I Am Canada series: Carol Matas's Footsteps in the Snow: The Red River Diary of Isobel Scott, Rupert's Land, 1815 as well as three books by Maxine Trottier, Blood upon Our Land: The North West Resistance Diary of Josephine Bouvier, Batoche, District of Saskatchewan, 1885; The Death of My Country: The Plains of Abraham Diary of Genevieve Aubuchon, Quebec, New France, 1759; and Storm the Fortress: The Siege of Quebec; William Jenkins, New France, 1759.
Despite repression of Aboriginal people from Batoche in 1885 to Oka in 1990, imperial misadventures from the Boer War and WW I to Kandahar, some Canadians really do believe that the military is always on the side of freedom and democracy.
This book completes the trilogy that began with Belle of Batoche and Outcasts of River Falls.