Batter

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batter

[′bad·ər]
(civil engineering)
A uniformly steep slope in a retaining wall or pier; inclination is expressed as 1 foot horizontally per vertical unit (in feet).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Batter

A wall that gently slopes inward toward the top.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

batter

To incline from the vertical. A wall is said to batter when it recedes as it rises.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Emotionally Intelligent Batterer Intervention" exceeds the standard level of care for domestic violence treatment programs ranging from 16 to 52 weeks in length.
Thus, a batterer's reign of terror constitutes nothing more than the sum of any of its parts that can be singled out and shown in isolation.
But there are also programs, usually court-mandated, to stop the batterers from their strikes against their intimate partner.
(19) Until local prosecutors charge domestic violence appropriately, the vast majority of convicted batterers will dodge the gun ban with impunity.
oversee[s] criminal cases, orders of protection, custody, visitation, and divorce matters for one family," thus relieving litigants of the burden of having "to navigate multiple court systems simultaneously." (87) Common characteristics of specialized domestic violence courts include a screening or intake process focused on identifying domestic violence cases, as well as any peripheral legal matters; specialized court personnel who are trained in domestic violence; (88) and coordination with community partners, such as "batterer intervention programs, probation departments, shelters, counseling services for victims, and supervised visitation programs." (89)
Carefully designing and implementing individually-tailored strategies may make it possible to improve results in intervention programmes with batterer men.
Many victims were also concerned about the batterer's mental health issues.
(1) Whether the parent has demonstrated that being awarded sole custody or joint physical or legal custody is in the child's best interests[;] (2) [w]hether the parent has successfully completed a batterer's prevention program[;] (3) [w]hether the parent has successfully completed a program of alcohol or drug abuse counseling, if the court determines that counseling is appropriate[;] (4) [w]hether the parent has successfully completed a parenting class, if the court determines that a parenting class is appropriate[;] (5) [i]f the parent is on probation, parole or community supervision, whether the parent is restrained by a protective order that was granted after a hearing[; and,] (6) [w]hether the parent has committed any further acts of domestic violence.
Batterer intervention programs (BIPs) are a well-established therapeutic service for men who batter women and are the current treatment of choice (Arias et al., 2002; James & Gilliland, 2005; Levesque, Driskell, Prochaska, & Prochaska, 2008; Levesque, Velicer, Castle, & Greene, 2008; Kistenmacher & Weiss, 2008).
The goal of this study was to examine the existing standards guiding batterer intervention services and make recommendations for further policy change.
Assessing the effect of batterer program completion on reassault using propensity scores.