Actium

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Actium

(ăk`tēəm, –shē–), promontory, NW Acarnania, Greece, at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. There are vestiges of several temples and an ancient town. At Actium was fought the naval battle (31 B.C.) in which the forces of Octavian (later Augustus) under Agrippa defeated the sea and land forces of Antony and Cleopatra. The battle established Octavian as ruler of Rome. The Actian games, held at NicopolisNicopolis
[Gr.,=city of victory], ancient city, NW Greece, in Epirus. It was founded by Octavian (later Augustus) to celebrate the victory (31 B.C.) at Actium, which is nearby. The city largely eclipsed Ambracia (see Árta). It is mentioned by St. Paul (Titus 3.12).
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 every four years, were established to commemorate the event.
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actium

[′ak·tē·əm]
(ecology)
A rocky seashore community.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Actium

Octavian’s naval defeat of Antony and Cleopatra (31 B.C.). [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 15]
See: Battle
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Actium

a town of ancient Greece that overlooked the naval battle in 31 bc at which Octavian's fleet under Agrippa defeated that of Mark Antony and Cleopatra
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, it must be mentioned that, the temple may have accrued its associations with the battle of Actium only a decade later.
(42) This decree supports Plutarch's account of events immediately before the Battle of Actium, in which he claims that Cleopatra offered Canidius Crassus extensive bribes to remain loyal to her.
There would be more years of fighting until 31 B.C., when Octavian, Caesar's nephew, collected all power to himself after defeating Mark Anthony in the battle of Actium, which Virgil celebrated in his last poem, the Aeneid.
After 10 years of rivalry, he forced Lepidus into retirement and defeated Mark Antony and his Egyptian allies led by Cleopatra at the naval battle of Actium.
Their bloody replay of Caesar and Pompey's earlier contest, complete with political compacts, arranged marriages, and agreements signed and broken, finally culminated in Octavian's defeat of Antony at the battle of Actium in 31 B.C.
sworn enemies (Battle of Actium, 31 BC), Antony's suicide after
The real point about this incident, which Shakespeare drives home to his audiences in his other Roman and early British plays, is that if Antony and Cleopatra with Enobarbus had won the battle of Actium, Western Europe and its civilization could have been fashioned on a corrupted system of government with personal, arbitrary rule exercised by eastern-style potentates, instead of that offered by Rome which favoured the rule of law and a system of government by consent which Octavius represents for theatre-goers to the play.
until Antony's defeat in the battle of Actium in 31 B.C.
Among the diverse crew are seventeenth-century pirates Anne Bonney and Mary Reed; Cleopatra, who commanded her own fleet at the Battle of Actium; and Madame Cheng I Sao, a Chinese corsair.
Cleopatra and Mark Anthony were defeated by Octavian, the future Emperor Augustus, in the battle of Actium in 31 B.C., which led the queen to commit suicide.
When Virgil pictures Apollo's decisive bowshot in his grand description of the battle of Actium in Aeneid 8, which is itself full of Gigantomachic associations, he may have been partly inspired by this piece of contemporary poetry.
In two millennia, nobody has ever suggested that Cleopatra survived following her disastrous defeat at the Battle of Actium, or that anyone murdered her.